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Open Access Articles- Top Results for 1980 Formula One season

1980 Formula One season

1980 FIA Formula One
World Championship season
Drivers' Champion: Alan Jones
Constructors' Champion: Williams-Ford
Previous: 1979 Next: 1981

The 1980 Formula One season was the 31st season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 1980 World Championship of Drivers and the 1980 International Cup for F1 Constructors[1] which were contested concurrently from 13 January to 5 October over a fourteen race series.[2] The season also included one non-championship race, the 1980 Spanish Grand Prix.[3]

Jones became the first (and so far as of 2014, the last) Australian to win the World Championship since Jack Brabham in 1966.

Drivers and constructors

File:Alan Jones 1980.jpg
Australian driver Alan Jones won the Drivers' Championship, driving for the Williams team
File:Piquet a Monza 1983.JPG
Nelson Piquet, driving for the Brabham team, finished second in the Drivers' Championship

The following drivers and constructors contested the 1980 World Championship of Drivers and the 1980 International Cup for F1 Constructors.

Entrant Constructor Chassis Engine Tyres No Driver Rounds
23x15px Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 312T5 Ferrari 015 3.0 F12 M 1 23x15px Jody Scheckter All
2 23x15px Gilles Villeneuve All
23x15px Candy Team Tyrrell Tyrrell-Ford 009
010
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G 3 23x15px Jean-Pierre Jarier All
4
  1. REDIRECT Template:Country data Republic of Ireland Derek Daly
All
43 23x15px Mike Thackwell 13–14
23x15px Parmalat Racing Team Brabham-Ford BT49 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G 5 23x15px Nelson Piquet All
6 23x15px Ricardo Zunino 1–7
23x15px Héctor Rebaque 8–14
23x15px Marlboro Team McLaren McLaren-Ford M29B
M29C
M30
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G 7 23x15px John Watson All
8 23x15px Alain Prost 1–3, 5–14
23x15px Stephen South 4
23x15px Team ATS ATS-Ford D3
D4
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G 9 23x16px Marc Surer 1–3, 7–14
23x15px Jan Lammers 4–6
10 1–3
23x15px Harald Ertl 9
23x15px Team Essex Lotus Lotus-Ford 81
81B
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G 11 23x15px Mario Andretti All
12 23x15px Elio de Angelis All
43 23x15px Nigel Mansell 10–12
23x15px Unipart Racing Team Ensign-Ford N180 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G 14 23x16px Clay Regazzoni 1–4
23x15px Tiff Needell 5–6
23x15px Jan Lammers 7–14
41 23x15px Geoff Lees 11–12
23x15px Equipe Renault Elf Renault RE20 Renault-Gordini EF1 1.5 V6t M 15 23x15px Jean-Pierre Jabouille 1–13
16 23x15px René Arnoux All
23x15px Theodore Shadow
23x15px Shadow Cars
Shadow-Ford DN11
DN12
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G 17 23x15px Stefan Johansson 1–2
23x15px Geoff Lees 3–7
18
  1. REDIRECT Template:Country data Republic of Ireland David Kennedy
1–7
23x15px Skol Fittipaldi Team Fittipaldi-Ford F7
F8
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G 20 23x15px Emerson Fittipaldi All
21 23x15px Keke Rosberg All
23x15px Marlboro Team Alfa Romeo Alfa Romeo 179 Alfa Romeo 1260 3.0 V12 G 22 23x15px Patrick Depailler 1–8
23x15px Vittorio Brambilla 11–12
23x15px Andrea de Cesaris 13–14
23 23x15px Bruno Giacomelli All
23x15px Equipe Ligier Gitanes Ligier-Ford JS11/15 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G 25 23x15px Didier Pironi All
26 23x15px Jacques Laffite All
23x15px Albilad Williams Racing Team Williams-Ford FW07
FW07B
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G 27 23x15px Alan Jones All
28 23x15px Carlos Reutemann All
23x15px Warsteiner Arrows Racing Team Arrows-Ford A3 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G 29 23x15px Riccardo Patrese All
30 23x15px Jochen Mass 1–10, 13–14
23x15px Mike Thackwell 11
23x15px Manfred Winkelhock 12
23x15px Osella Squadra Corse Osella-Ford FA1
FA1B
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G 31 23x15px Eddie Cheever All
23x15px Brands Hatch Racing Williams-Ford FW07 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G 43 23x15px Desiré Wilson 8
23x15px RAM – Penthouse Rizla Racing
23x15px RAM – Rainbow Jeans Racing
23x15px RAM – Williams Grand Prix Engineering
Williams-Ford FW07 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G 50 23x15px Rupert Keegan 8–14
51 23x15px Kevin Cogan 13
23x15px Geoff Lees 14

Season summary

Round 1: Argentina

The 1980 Formula One season started in Argentina in January- where the teams escaped the cold misery of a European winter and into the intense heat of a South American summer. This event, held at the Buenos Aires Municipal Autodrome located in the sprawling Argentine capital, started off badly. After Friday's practice, due to the heat and the suction these ground-effect cars were creating, the track began to break up, and the drivers found conditions difficult and even dangerous. Led by Emerson Fittipaldi, the drivers staged a semi-unsuccessful protest- the organizers did actually fix the track, but not successfully- come race day, the track was still in a dreadful condition. The race went ahead anyway, and the Buenos Aires circuit, being one of the most varied and challenging circuits on the calendar, provided an ultra-exciting race, where many drivers were caught-out by the disintegration of the twisty arena infield section of the No.15 variant of the racing facility. After going off twice and dropping back to 4th after making a pit-stop to clean grass out of his car's radiators, Australian and title favorite Alan Jones took victory in his Williams-Ford/Cosworth. Brazilian Nelson Piquet, who also went off a few times finished 2nd, and Finn Keke Rosberg scored an excellent 3rd in his Fittipaldi. French rookie Alain Prost, in his first ever F1 race, finished 6th and scored his first ever World Championship point. Gilles Villeneuve, competitive throughout in his Ferrari, crashed heavily at the Toboggan left-right sequence of corners after his front suspension failed after possible damage caused to it after a number of off-track excursions the Canadian had during the race.

Round 2: Brazil

The other half of the South American January tour took place in Brazil. This meeting was also met with pre-race difficulties. The safety conditions of the very difficult and demanding 5-mile Interlagos circuit located in the steel-making metropolis of São Paulo had been heavily protested by the drivers for some time, led by South African Ferrari driver Jody Scheckter. They protested that the track's surface (already notorious for being very rough) was so bad that it was actually dangerous to race on. Also, the barriers and catch-fence arrangements were not adequate enough to protect the cars from the embankments and very rough and uneven-surface of the limited run-off areas there, even though the track was very wide in most places. But the race went ahead anyway, and the Renault of Frenchman Jean-Pierre Jabouille took pole and led for 25 of 40 laps. The Renaults proved to be dominant at Interlagos, which was 2,840 ft (850 m) above sea level, giving the turbocharged Renault engines a considerable horsepower advantage. But he retired with turbo failure and his teammate Rene Arnoux took the lead and won, followed by Italian new-boy Elio de Angelis in a Lotus and Jones in his Williams.

Round 3: South Africa

The GP circus arrived in South Africa in March, at the fast Kyalami circuit between Johannesburg and Pretoria in the midst of an African summer. Alain Prost crashed his McLaren at the Esses and broke his wrist; he would miss this and the next race in Long Beach; while Marc Surer had it worse- he crashed heavily at Crowthorne and broke his leg; he missed the next 3 races. Like Interlagos before, the even higher altitude of Kyalami helped the Renaults even more so than in Brazil, and this proved to be an invaluable advantage, and the yellow French cars dominated the race. And as in São Paulo, Jabouille led for a while and retired, and Arnoux took the lead from 2nd place and won the race. However, this race effectively brought the FISA-FOCA war into the spotlight. FISA, the governing body of international motorsports (and the organization that the 3 big constructors (Renault, Ferrari and Alfa Romeo were aligned to) led by Jean-Marie Balestre, argued that the ground effect cars of the time were too fast through corners, and FOCA (Formula One Constructor's Association, representing the mostly British independent constructors) led by Bernie Ecclestone and Max Mosley, argued that the superior road-holding of the independent teams' cars equalized their cars to the power advantages that particularly the Renaults had.

Round 4: United States West

A stop-over in Long Beach, California right next to the Hollywood-dominated landscape of Los Angeles happened 4 weeks after the South African race. The typically pleasant and sunny weather there gave for a relaxed atmosphere at this tight, twisty and rough street circuit (1 of 2 on the calendar- the other being Monaco) which was in contrast to the previous 3 quick Southern Hemisphere circuits used thus far in the season. With its tight, slow layout being lined with totally unforgiving concrete walls, Long Beach was often known then to be the toughest and most punishing race of the season on the car and driver, and often produced tough, grueling and long but exciting races; however, this race was not to be as exciting as one would have hoped. Nelson Piquet effectively dominated this long, gruelling race in his Brabham-Ford/Cosworth- he took pole, set fastest lap and led from start to finish and took his first of 23 race victories. But the race itself was littered with accidents- there was a pile-up at the Le Gasomet hairpin and the 40-year old Swiss Clay Regazzoni crashed appallingly at the end of the long, flat-out Shoreline Drive when the brakes on his Ensign failed and he crashed head on at 180 mph into Ricardo Zunino's parked Brabham, then through some tires and into a concrete wall. The Swiss was critically injured, but survived; he would be paralyzed from the waist down for the rest of his life.

Round 5: Belgium

The F1 circus started its 4-month long European tour at Zolder in Belgium, where Frenchman Didier Pironi took his first ever victory in his Ligier-Ford/Cosworth ahead of Alan Jones and his Argentinean teammate Carlos Reutemann.

Round 6: Monaco

The classic street race in Monaco provided some excitement: there was a big pile-up at the start, where Derek Daly went flying twice over a number of cars at the first corner. He took out Prost in a McLaren, his teammate Jean-Pierre Jarier and Bruno Giacomelli in an Alfa. Didier Pironi led and crashed, and Carlos Reutemann took the lead and won from Frenchman Jacques Laffite in a Ligier-Ford/Cosworth and Piquet in a Brabham.

Round 7 (Eventually stripped of championship status): Spain

The Spanish Grand Prix at the tight and twisty Jarama circuit near Madrid ended up losing its championship status after Jean-Marie Balestre announced on morning of Friday's practice (in an attempt to put FOCA in their place) that the 1980 Spanish GP would not count as a championship round. Balestre also stripped the drivers of their racing licenses. The FISA-supported manufacturer teams- Renault, Ferrari, and Alfa all pulled out, and the FOCA-supported independent constructors stayed to race. The race was won by Alan Jones, who had also taken pole. The race's loss of championship status hurt the event quite badly; as it was only to be hosted once more at Jarama during the following year.

Round 7: France

The French Grand Prix took place while the lingering controversy of Spain still raged on. With their racing licenses given back to them, the drivers got on with their jobs, and at the Paul Ricard circuit on the southern French riviera near Marseille, Williams driver Jones beat the Ligiers of Jacques Laffite and Didier Pironi on home soil.

Round 8: Great Britain

The British Grand Prix in 1980 was at Brands Hatch, just outside of London. This race on this challenging and bumpy circuit saw the Ligiers of Pironi and Laffite lead and fall out; Pironi retired after a puncture and Laffite crashed at Hawthorn's. Alan Jones took advantage of the Ligier's problems and held off a quick Nelson Piquet to win yet again in his Williams.

Round 9: West Germany

The German Grand Prix at the ultra-fast Hockenheimring was marred by the fatal pre-race testing accident of Patrick Depailler at the ultra-high speed, top gear, flat out Ost-Kurve 9 days before the race. Suspension failure on his Alfa caused him to crash massively after his car overturned and vaulted the barriers, causing fatal head injuries. Alan Jones took pole from Renault driver Jabouille by mere hundredths of a second, and he led the race until he had to come in with a puncture on the straight before the stadium. Laffite and Reutemann passed Jones, who finished 3rd. Laffite went on to win for Ligier, followed by the Williams duo of Reutemann and Jones.

Round 10: Austria

The European high-speed circuit tour kept coming, and the fastest circuit of the season- the spectacular Osterreichring in the Styrian mountains enabled Jabouille to win by mere seconds from Alan Jones. Renault driver Jabouille, who had retired from every race he had participated in so far in the season, finally finished. His development work with Renault over the past 4 seasons gave him his 2nd and last F1 victory of his career.

Round 11: Holland

The beach-side Zandvoort circuit near Amsterdam, modified from the previous year saw Brazilian Nelson Piquet win from Frenchmen Arnoux and Laffite. The Renaults dominated qualifying, although Jabouille retired and Jones went out after accident damage.

Round 12: Italy

The European tour concluded with the Italian Grand Prix being held at the Autodromo Dino Ferrari near the town of Imola, rather than Monza. The Dino Ferrari circuit, located near the Ferrari factory had signed a deal to alternate the Italian GP with Monza, on the condition Monza improve its track safety and facilities. The deal had been signed before Monza made changes; so for the first time since 1948 the Italian GP was not held at Monza. The Renaults dominated qualifying at this fast Italian circuit, although they fell out with mechanical problems; and Piquet won yet again and overtook Jones in the championship, who finished 2nd in front of his teammate Carlos Reutemann.

Round 13: Canada

The final leg of the 1980 Formula One season was a 2-part tour in North America, starting in Canada, at the Ile-Notre Dame circuit in Montreal. This race had to be restarted after a multiple pile-up involving Piquet at the start. Piquet jumped into the spare car, which had a short-lasting qualifying Ford/Cosworth engine in it- and although Piquet was clearly faster than anyone else, the engine in his Brabham blew up early on, and Jones won the race, which effectively gave the gritty Australian his only ever Formula One Driver's championship, and Williams's first ever Constructor's Championship. Unfortunately, Jabouille's weekend was much worse: he crashed head on into a tire-wall and broke both his legs.

Round 14: United States East

The other half of the North American visit and the last round of the 1980 Formula One season was the second round in the United States at the fast, dauntingly challenging Watkins Glen circuit in New York State, four hours from New York City and only 5 hours from Montreal. This race had been in doubt for almost the whole season, but thankfully, on this quick, demanding and elevated circuit located in the rolling vineyard hills above Seneca Lake, it went ahead after a loan was given by FOCA to the organizers. French rookie Alain Prost, who had been consistently faster all season than his experienced British teammate John Watson, crashed heavily in practice and received a concussion; he had to miss the race but was at the circuit on race day. Bruno Giacomelli took pole in his Alfa, the first time an Alfa Romeo had been on pole since 1951. Giacomelli made a perfect start and led for most of this exciting race up until Lap 32, when the electrics in his Alfa failed in the Boot section of the course. Jones, however, produced a storming drive, when he went off at the first corner at the start and dropped to 16th; he stormed through and took 2nd from his Argentine teammate Carlos Reutemann, and then inherited the lead from Giacomelli after the Italian retired. The Australian Jones won his 5th race of the year (6 if Spain is counted) ahead of Reutemann and Didier Pironi in a Ligier. 1978 champion Mario Andretti scored his only point of the 1980 season at Watkins Glen, close to his hometown in Nazareth, Pennsylvania. Unfortunately, this was to be the last championship Formula One race at Watkins Glen. The corporation running the circuit was heavily in debt and went bankrupt; and the circuit was struck from the 1981 season calendar in May of that year and although there were other Grand Prixs that would be run in the United States during the 1980s aside from Long Beach, the United States Grand Prix would not be run again until 1989 on a street circuit in Phoenix, Arizona.

Championship review

Rnd Race Date Location Pole Position Fastest Lap Race Winner Constructor Report
1 23x15px Argentine Grand Prix 13 January Buenos Aires 23x15px Alan Jones 23x15px Alan Jones 23x15px Alan Jones 23x15px Williams-Ford Report
2 23x15px Brazilian Grand Prix 27 January Interlagos 23x15px Jean-Pierre Jabouille 23x15px René Arnoux 23x15px René Arnoux 23x15px Renault Report
3 23x15px South African Grand Prix 1 March Kyalami 23x15px Jean-Pierre Jabouille 23x15px René Arnoux 23x15px René Arnoux 23x15px Renault Report
4 23x15px United States Grand Prix West 30 March Long Beach 23x15px Nelson Piquet 23x15px Nelson Piquet 23x15px Nelson Piquet 23x15px Brabham-Ford Report
5 23x15px Belgian Grand Prix 4 May Zolder 23x15px Alan Jones 23x15px Jacques Laffite 23x15px Didier Pironi 23x15px Ligier-Ford Report
6 23x15px Monaco Grand Prix 18 May Monaco 23x15px Didier Pironi 23x15px Carlos Reutemann 23x15px Carlos Reutemann 23x15px Williams-Ford Report
7 23x15px French Grand Prix 29 June Paul Ricard 23x15px Jacques Laffite 23x15px Alan Jones 23x15px Alan Jones 23x15px Williams-Ford Report
8 23x15px British Grand Prix 13 July Brands Hatch 23x15px Didier Pironi 23x15px Didier Pironi 23x15px Alan Jones 23x15px Williams-Ford Report
9 23x15px German Grand Prix 10 August Hockenheimring 23x15px Alan Jones 23x15px Alan Jones 23x15px Jacques Laffite 23x15px Ligier-Ford Report
10 23x15px Austrian Grand Prix 17 August Österreichring 23x15px René Arnoux 23x15px René Arnoux 23x15px Jean-Pierre Jabouille 23x15px Renault Report
11 23x15px Dutch Grand Prix 31 August Zandvoort 23x15px René Arnoux 23x15px René Arnoux 23x15px Nelson Piquet 23x15px Brabham-Ford Report
12 23x15px Italian Grand Prix 14 September Imola 23x15px René Arnoux 23x15px Alan Jones 23x15px Nelson Piquet 23x15px Brabham-Ford Report
13 23x15px Canadian Grand Prix 28 September Île Notre-Dame 23x15px Nelson Piquet 23x15px Didier Pironi 23x15px Alan Jones 23x15px Williams-Ford Report
14 23x15px United States Grand Prix 5 October Watkins Glen 23x15px Bruno Giacomelli 23x15px Alan Jones 23x15px Alan Jones 23x15px Williams-Ford Report

Because of the FISA-FOCA dispute concerning ground-effect aerodynamics, it was announced on Friday's practice for the Spanish Grand Prix at Jarama held on June 1 was not going to be held under FISA regulations, therefore, it would not be counted as a Formula One championship race. The race was won by Alan Jones.

1980 World Championship of Drivers – final standings

Points towards the 1980 World Championship of Drivers were awarded on a 9-6-4-3-2-1 basis for the first six positions in each race. Only the best five results from the first seven races and the best five results from the remaining seven races could be retained by each driver.

Pos Driver ARG
23x15px
BRA
23x15px
RSA
23x15px
USW
23x15px
BEL
23x15px
MON
23x15px
FRA
23x15px
GBR
23x15px
GER
23x15px
AUT
23x15px
NED
23x15px
ITA
23x15px
CAN
23x15px
USA
23x15px
Pts[4]
1 23x15px Alan Jones 1 3 Ret Ret 2 Ret 1 1 (3) 2 11 2 1 1 67 (71)
2 23x15px Nelson Piquet 2 Ret 4 1 Ret 3 4 2 4 5 1 1 Ret Ret 54
3 23x15px Carlos Reutemann Ret Ret 5 Ret 3 1 6 3 2 3 (4) (3) 2 2 42 (49)
4 23x15px Jacques Laffite Ret Ret 2 Ret 11 2 3 Ret 1 4 3 9 8 5 34
5 23x15px Didier Pironi Ret 4 3 6 1 Ret 2 Ret Ret Ret Ret 6 3 3 32
6 23x15px René Arnoux Ret 1 1 9 4 Ret 5 NC Ret 9 2 10 Ret 7 29
7 23x15px Elio de Angelis Ret 2 Ret Ret 10 9 Ret Ret 16 6 Ret 4 10 4 13
8 23x15px Jean-Pierre Jabouille Ret Ret Ret 10 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 1 Ret Ret Ret 9
9 23x15px Riccardo Patrese Ret 6 Ret 2 Ret 8 9 9 9 14 Ret Ret Ret Ret 7
10 23x15px Keke Rosberg 3 9 Ret Ret 7 DNQ Ret DNQ Ret 16 DNQ 5 9 10 6
11 23x15px John Watson Ret 11 11 4 NC DNQ 7 8 Ret Ret Ret Ret 4 NC 6
12
  1. REDIRECT Template:Country data Republic of Ireland Derek Daly
4 14 Ret 8 9 Ret 11 4 10 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 6
13 23x15px Jean-Pierre Jarier Ret 12 7 Ret 5 Ret Ret 5 15 Ret 5 13 7 NC 6
14 23x15px Gilles Villeneuve Ret 16 Ret Ret 6 5 8 Ret 6 8 7 Ret 5 Ret 6
15 23x15px Emerson Fittipaldi NC 15 8 3 Ret 6 Ret 12 Ret 11 Ret Ret Ret Ret 5
16 23x15px Alain Prost 6 5 DNS Ret Ret Ret 6 11 7 6 7 Ret DNS 5
17 23x15px Jochen Mass Ret 10 6 7 Ret 4 10 13 8 DNQ 11 Ret 4
18 23x15px Bruno Giacomelli 5 13 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 5 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 4
19 23x15px Jody Scheckter Ret Ret Ret 5 8 Ret 12 10 13 13 9 8 DNQ 11 2
20 23x15px Mario Andretti Ret Ret 12 Ret Ret 7 Ret Ret 7 Ret 8 Ret Ret 6 1
21 23x15px Héctor Rebaque 7 Ret 10 Ret Ret 6 Ret 1
23x16px Marc Surer Ret 7 DNS Ret Ret 12 12 10 Ret DNQ 8 0
23x15px Ricardo Zunino 7 8 10 Ret Ret DNQ Ret 0
23x15px Rupert Keegan 11 DNQ 15 DNQ 11 DNQ 9 0
23x16px Clay Regazzoni NC Ret 9 Ret 0
23x15px Jan Lammers DNQ DNQ DNQ Ret 12 NC DNQ DNQ 14 DNQ DNQ DNQ 12 Ret 0
23x15px Eddie Cheever DNQ DNQ Ret Ret DNQ DNQ Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 12 Ret Ret 0
23x15px Geoff Lees 13 DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ Ret DNQ DNQ 0
23x15px Patrick Depailler Ret Ret NC Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 0
23x15px Nigel Mansell Ret Ret DNQ 0
23x15px Vittorio Brambilla Ret Ret 0
23x15px Andrea de Cesaris Ret Ret 0
23x15px Mike Thackwell DNQ Ret DNQ 0
23x15px Tiff Needell Ret DNQ 0
  1. REDIRECT Template:Country data Republic of Ireland David Kennedy
DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ 0
23x15px Stefan Johansson DNQ DNQ 0
23x15px Stephen South DNQ 0
23x15px Desiré Wilson DNQ 0
23x15px Harald Ertl DNQ 0
23x15px Manfred Winkelhock DNQ 0
23x15px Kevin Cogan DNQ 0
Pos Driver ARG
23x15px
BRA
23x15px
RSA
23x15px
USW
23x15px
BEL
23x15px
MON
23x15px
FRA
23x15px
GBR
23x15px
GER
23x15px
AUT
23x15px
NED
23x15px
ITA
23x15px
CAN
23x15px
USA
23x15px
Pts
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Points finish
Blue Non-points finish
Non-classified finish (NC)
Purple Did not finish (Ret)
Red Did not qualify (DNQ)
Did not pre-qualify (DNPQ)
Black Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Race cancelled (C)
Light blue Practiced only (PO)
Friday test driver (TD)
(from 2003 onwards)
Blank Did not practice (DNP)
Excluded (EX)
Did not arrive (DNA)

1980 International Cup for F1 Constructors – final standings

Points for the 1980 International Cup for F1 Constructors were awarded on a 9-6-4-3-2-1 basis for the first six positions in each race. All points received by a constructor were retained towards the final total.[5]

Pos Constructor Car
no.
ARG
23x15px
BRA
23x15px
RSA
23x15px
USW
23x15px
BEL
23x15px
MON
23x15px
FRA
23x15px
GBR
23x15px
GER
23x15px
AUT
23x15px
NED
23x15px
ITA
23x15px
CAN
23x15px
USA
23x15px
Pts
1 23x15px Williams-Ford 27 1 3 Ret Ret 2 Ret 1 1 3 2 11 2 1 1 120
28 Ret Ret 5 Ret 3 1 6 3 2 3 4 3 2 2
43 DNQ
50 11 DNQ 15 DNQ 11 DNQ 9
51 DNQ DNQ
2 23x15px Ligier-Ford 25 Ret 4 3 6 1 Ret 2 Ret Ret Ret Ret 6 3 3 66
26 Ret Ret 2 Ret 11 2 3 Ret 1 4 3 9 8 5
3 23x15px Brabham-Ford 5 2 Ret 4 1 Ret 3 4 2 4 5 1 1 Ret Ret 55
6 7 8 10 Ret Ret DNQ Ret 7 Ret 10 Ret Ret 6 Ret
4 23x15px Renault 15 Ret Ret Ret 10 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 1 Ret Ret Ret 38
16 Ret 1 1 9 4 Ret 5 NC Ret 9 2 10 Ret 7
5 23x15px Lotus-Ford 11 Ret Ret 12 Ret Ret 7 Ret Ret 7 Ret 8 Ret Ret 6 14
12 Ret 2 Ret Ret 10 9 Ret Ret 16 6 Ret 4 10 4
43 Ret Ret DNQ
6 23x15px Tyrrell-Ford 3 Ret 12 7 Ret 5 Ret Ret 5 15 Ret 5 13 7 NC 12
4 4 14 Ret 8 9 Ret 11 4 10 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret
43 Ret DNQ
7 23x15px Arrows-Ford 29 Ret 6 Ret 2 Ret 8 9 9 9 14 Ret Ret Ret Ret 11
30 Ret 10 6 7 Ret 4 10 13 8 DNQ DNQ DNQ 11 Ret
8 23x15px Fittipaldi-Ford 20 NC 15 8 3 Ret 6 Ret 12 Ret 11 Ret Ret Ret Ret 11
21 3 9 Ret Ret 7 DNQ Ret DNQ Ret 16 DNQ 5 9 10
9 23x15px McLaren-Ford 7 Ret 11 11 4 NC DNQ 7 8 Ret Ret Ret Ret 4 NC 11
8 6 5 DNS DNQ Ret Ret Ret 6 11 7 6 7 Ret DNS
10 23x15px Ferrari 1 Ret Ret Ret 5 8 Ret 12 10 13 13 9 8 DNQ 11 8
2 Ret 16 Ret Ret 6 5 8 Ret 6 8 7 Ret 5 Ret
11 23x15px Alfa Romeo 22 Ret Ret NC Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 4
23 5 13 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 5 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret
23x15px ATS-Ford 9 Ret 7 DNS Ret 12 NC Ret Ret 12 12 10 Ret DNQ 8 0
10 DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ
23x15px Ensign-Ford 14 NC Ret 9 Ret Ret DNQ DNQ DNQ 14 DNQ DNQ DNQ 12 Ret 0
41 Ret DNQ
23x15px Osella-Ford 31 DNQ DNQ Ret Ret DNQ DNQ Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 12 Ret Ret 0
23x15px Shadow-Ford 17 DNQ DNQ 13 DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ 0
18 DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ
Pos Constructor Car
no.
ARG
23x15px
BRA
23x15px
RSA
23x15px
USW
23x15px
BEL
23x15px
MON
23x15px
FRA
23x15px
GBR
23x15px
GER
23x15px
AUT
23x15px
NED
23x15px
ITA
23x15px
CAN
23x15px
USA
23x15px
Pts

Non-Championship race results

The 1980 Formula One season also included one non-championship race.[3]

Race Name Circuit Date Winning driver Constructor Report
23x15px Spanish Grand Prix Jarama 1 June 23x15px Alan Jones 23x15px Williams-Ford Report

Notes and references

  1. ^ 1980 FIA Yearbook, page 11
  2. ^ Motor Sport, January 1981, page 44
  3. ^ a b Motor Sport, January 1981, page 45
  4. ^ Only the best 5 results from the first 7 races and the best 5 results from the last 7 races counted towards the Drivers' Championship. If different from Championship points, total points scored are shown in parentheses.
  5. ^ Motor, February 1981, page 69

External links