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4-HO-DET

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4-HO-DET
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Systematic (IUPAC) name
3-(2-diethylaminoethyl)-1H-indol-4-ol
Clinical data
Identifiers
22204-89-3 7pxN
PubChem CID 9991554
ChemSpider 8167136 7pxY
ChEMBL CHEMBL143202 7pxY
Chemical data
Formula C14H20N2O
232.32 g/mol
Physical data
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4-HO-DET, also known as 4-hydroxy-diethyl-tryptamine, CZ-74, or ethocin, is a hallucinogenic drug and psychedelic compound of moderate duration. 4-HO-DET is a substituted tryptamine, structurally related to psilocin and 4-HO-DIPT.

Analogs

The acetic acid ester of 4-HO-DET is known as 4-AcO-DET or ethacetin. The phosphoric acid ester of 4-HO-DET is known as 4-phosphoryloxy-DET, CEY-19, or ethocybin.

History

4-HO-DET received the lab code CZ-74 in the late 1950s by the inventors of the substance, Albert Hofmann and Franz Troxler. The substance was used together with its phosphoryloxy-analog CEY-19 in human clinical trials in the 1960s by the German researchers Hanscarl Leuner and G. Baer.

Dosage

10-25mg is the usual oral dosage for 4-HO-DET, while the acetate and phosphate esters are said to require a slightly higher dosage.

Effects

Ethocin produces entheogenic effects similar to LSD and psilocybin. Some users have reported unpleasant anxiety and stimulation with this drug, while other accounts label the experience as being much milder than LSD or psilocybin.

Drug prohibition laws

Sweden

Sveriges riksdags health ministry Statens folkhälsoinstitut classified 4-HO-DET as "health hazard" under the act Lagen om förbud mot vissa hälsofarliga varor (translated Act on the Prohibition of Certain Goods Dangerous to Health) as of Nov 1, 2005, in their regulation SFS 2005:733 listed as 4-hydroxi-N,N-dietyltryptamin (4-HO-DET), making it illegal to sell or possess.[1]

See also

References

External links