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Open Access Articles- Top Results for 4-MeO-PCP

4-MeO-PCP

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4-MeO-PCP
200px
Systematic (IUPAC) name
1-[1-(4-methoxyphenyl)cyclohexyl]-piperidine
Clinical data
Identifiers
2201-35-6 7pxY
91164-58-8 (hydrochloride)
None
ChemSpider 10526416 7pxY
Chemical data
Formula C18H27NO
273.412 g/mol
 14pxY (what is this?)  (verify)


4-Methoxyphencyclidine (methoxydine, 4-MeO-PCP) is a dissociative anesthetic drug that has been sold online as a research chemical. The synthesis of 4-MeO-PCP was first reported in 1965 by the Parke-Davis medicinal chemist Victor Maddox.[1] A 1999 review published by a chemist using the pseudonym John Q. Beagle suggested the potency of 4-MeO-PCP in man was reduced relative to PCP, two years later Beagle published a detailed description of the synthesis and qualitative effects of 4-MeO-PCP, which he said possessed 70% the potency of PCP.[1] 4-MeO-PCP was the first arylcyclohexylamine research chemical to be sold online, it was introduced in late 2008 by a company trading under the name CBAY and was followed by several related compounds such as 3-MeO-PCP and methoxetamine.[1][2] 4-MeO-PCP has lower affinity for the NMDA receptor than PCP, but higher affinity than ketamine, it is orally active in a dosage range similar to ketamine, with some users requiring doses in excess of 100mg for desired effects.[3][1] Users have reported substantial differences in active dose, these discrepancies can be partially explained by the presence of unreacted PCC and other impurities in samples sold on the grey market.[1] Though 4-MeO-PCP has been suggested to possess dopaminergic activity, it is a relatively selective ligand for the NMDA receptor without appreciable affinity for the dopamine transporter.[4][3]

4-MeO-PCP hydrochloride is a white crystalline solid with a melting point of 181-182°C [5]

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Morris, H.; Wallach, J. (2014). "From PCP to MXE: a comprehensive review of the non-medical use of dissociative drugs". Drug Testing and Analysis 6: 614–632. doi:10.1002/dta.1620. 
  2. [King LA. New drugs coming our way - what are they and how do we detect them? EMCDDA Conference, Lisbon, 6–8 May 2009 http://www.emcdda.europa.eu/attachements.cfm/att_78745_EN_4_King.pps]
  3. 3.0 3.1 Roth, B.; Gibbons, S. (2013). "The Ketamine Analogue Methoxetamine and 3- and 4-Methoxy Analogues of Phencyclidine Are High Affinity and Selective Ligands for the Glutamate NMDA Receptor=PLoS ONE". PLoS ONE 8: e59334. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0059334. 
  4. "(ACMD) Methoxetamine Report (2012)" (PDF). UK Home Office. 2012-10-18. p. 14. Retrieved 2012-10-22. 
  5. Wallach J, De Paoli G, Adejare A, Brandt S (2013). "Preparation and analytical characterization of 1-(1-phenylcyclohexyl)piperidine (PCP) and 1-(1-phenylcyclohexyl)pyrrolidine (PCPy) analogues". Drug Testing and Analysis 6: 633–650. doi:10.1002/dta.1468. 


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