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Open Access Articles- Top Results for Ampelopsin

Ampelopsin

For other uses, see Ampelopsin (compounds).
Ampelopsin
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IUPAC name
(2R,3R)-3,5,7-trihydroxy-2-(3,4,5-trihydroxyphenyl)-2,3-dihydrochromen-4-one
Other names
Dihydromyricetin
Ampeloptin
(+)-Ampelopsin
(+)-Dihydromyricetin
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27200-12-0 7pxY
ChEBI CHEBI:28429 7pxN
ChemSpider 16735660 7pxY
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C15H12O8
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Ampelopsin, also known as dihydromyricetin, is a flavanonol, a type of flavonoid. It is found in the Ampelopsis species japonica, megalophylla, and grossedentata; Cercidiphyllum japonicum; Hovenia dulcis; Rhododendron cinnabarinum; some Pinus species; and some Cedrus species,[1] as well as in Salix sachalinensis.[2]

Hovenia dulcis has been used in traditional Japanese, Chinese, and Korean medicines to treat fever, parasitic infection, as a laxative, and a treatment of liver diseases, and as a hangover treatment.[3] Methods have been developed to extract ampelopsin from it at large scales, and laboratory research has been conducted with the compound to see if it might be useful as a drug in any of the conditions for which the parent plant has been traditionally used.[3]

References

  1. ^ Jiaju Zhou, Guirong Xie, Xinjian Yan Encyclopedia of Traditional Chinese Medicines - Molecular Structures, Pharmacological Activities, Natural Sources and Applications: Vol. 1: Isolated Compounds A-C. Springer Science & Business Media, 2011 ISBN 9783642167355
  2. ^ Tahara S. A journey of twenty-five years through the ecological biochemistry of flavonoids. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem. 2007 Jun;71(6):1387-404. PMID 17587669
  3. ^ a b Hyun TK et al. Hovenia dulcis--an Asian traditional herb. Planta Med. 2010 Jul;76(10):943-9. PMID 20379955



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