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Androstanediol glucuronide

Androstanediol glucuronide
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IUPAC name
(3α,5α,17β)-17-Hydroxyandrostan-3-yl β-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid
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ChemSpider 20558912
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C25H40O8
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Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Androstanediol glucuronide (ADG) is a metabolite of dihydrotestosterone and testosterone.[1] In women the adrenal steroids, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, androstenedione and dehydroepiandrosterone are the major precursors of plasma ADG, accounting for almost the totality of circulating ADG. ADG levels decrease significantly with age.[2] Androstanediol glucuronide is used as a marker of target tissue cellular action. ADG correlates with level of 5 alpha reductase activity (testosterone and androstanediol to dihydrotestosterone) in the skin. ADG is a measure of cutaneous androgen metabolism. it reflects specific type of liver function and the impact of major precursor derived from adrenal glands.[3]

See also

References

  1. Moghissi E, Ablan F, Horton R (September 1984). "Origin of plasma androstanediol glucuronide in men". The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 59 (3): 417–21. PMID 6746859. doi:10.1210/jcem-59-3-417. 
  2. Vermeulen A, Giagulli VA (November 1991). "Physiopathology of plasma androstanediol-glucuronide". The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 39 (5B): 829–33. PMID 1835405. doi:10.1016/0960-0760(91)90032-z. 
  3. http://www.hormonetestingmd.com/product_p/androstanediol-glucuronide.htm[full citation needed]