Adverts

Open Access Articles- Top Results for Cyanoacetylene

Cyanoacetylene

Cyanoacetylene[1]
200px
200px
colspan=2 style="background:#f8eaba; border-top:2px solid transparent; border-bottom:2px solid transparent; text-align:center;" #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
This page is a soft redirect. Names

#REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
This page is a soft redirect.-

IUPAC name
Prop-2-ynenitrile
Other names
Propiolonitrile; Cyanoethyne; Monocyanoacetylene; 2-Propynenitrile
colspan=2 style="background:#f8eaba; border-top:2px solid transparent; border-bottom:2px solid transparent; text-align:center;" #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
This page is a soft redirect. Identifiers#REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
This page is a soft redirect.-



1070-71-9 7pxY
Jmol-3D images Image
PubChem Template:Chembox PubChem/format
colspan=2 style="background:#f8eaba; border-top:2px solid transparent; border-bottom:2px solid transparent; text-align:center;" #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
This page is a soft redirect. Properties

#REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
This page is a soft redirect.-

C3HN
Molar mass Lua error in Module:Math at line 495: attempt to index field 'ParserFunctions' (a nil value). g·mol−1
Melting point Script error: No such module "convert".
Boiling point Script error: No such module "convert".
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
 14pxY verify (what is10pxY/10pxN?)
Infobox references

Cyanoacetylene is an organic compound with formula Template:Chem/atomTemplate:Chem/atomTemplate:Chem/atom or H-C≡C-C≡N. It is the simplest cyanopolyyne. Cyanoacetylene has been detected by spectroscopic methods in interstellar clouds,[2] in the coma of comet Hale–Bopp and in the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan.[3]

Cyanoacetylene is one of the molecules that was produced in the Miller–Urey experiment.

See also

References

  1. ^ Murahashi, Shunsuke; Takizawa, Takeo; Kurioka, Shohei; Maekawa, Seiji (1956). "Cyanoacetylene. I. The synthesis and some chemical properties". Nippon Kagaku Zasshi 77 (11): 1689–1692. doi:10.1246/nikkashi1948.77.1689. 
  2. ^ Solomon, Philip M (1973). "Interstellar molecules". Physics Today 26 (3): 32–40. doi:10.1063/1.3127983. 
  3. ^ H. B. Niemann et al. (2005). "The abundances of constituents of Titan's atmosphere from the GCMS instrument on the Huygens probe". Nature 438 (7069): 779–784. Bibcode:2005Natur.438..779N. PMID 16319830. doi:10.1038/nature04122.