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Open Access Articles- Top Results for Douglas XT-30

Douglas XT-30

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XT-30
Role

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This page is a soft redirect. Advanced trainer #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
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National origin

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This page is a soft redirect. United States #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
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Manufacturer

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This page is a soft redirect. Douglas Aircraft Company #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
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Status

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This page is a soft redirect. Not built #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
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The Douglas XT-30 was a proposed American military advanced trainer. It was never built.

Design and development

Intended to replace the North American T-6 Texan, the XT-30 was designed in 1948 for a United States Air Force competition. The design had an Script error: No such module "convert". Wright R-1300 radial mounted amidships behind the cockpit (in the fashion of the P-39),[1] in a rather squared-off fuselage.[2] The R-1300 drove a three-bladed propeller by way of an extension shaft (driveshaft).[3] The XT-30 design seated pilot and pupil in tandem, under a framed greenhouse canopy[4] and had a straight low wing.[5]

Competing against the North American T-28 Trojan, the more complex XT-30 was not selected for production and none were built.[6]

Specifications (projected)

Data from Francillon, René J. McDonnell Douglas aircraft since 1920. London : Putnam, 1979.

General characteristics

Performance

See also

References

Notes
  1. ^ Francillon, René J. McDonnell Douglas aircraft since 1920 (Putnam, 1979), p.714.
  2. ^ Francillon, diagram p.714.
  3. ^ Francillon, p.714.
  4. ^ Francillon diagram p.714.
  5. ^ Francillon, diagram p.715.
  6. ^ Francillon, p.714.
Bibliography
  • Francillon, René J. McDonnell Douglas aircraft since 1920. London : Putnam, 1979.
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