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Ewell Blackwell

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Ewell Blackwell
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Pitcher
Born: (1922-10-23)October 23, 1922
Fresno, California
Died: October 29, 1996(1996-10-29) (aged 74)
Hendersonville, North Carolina
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 21, 1942 for the Cincinnati Reds
Last MLB appearance
April 18, 1955 for the Kansas City Athletics
Career statistics
Win–loss record 82–78
Earned run average 3.30
Strikeouts 839
Teams
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Career highlights and awards

Ewell Blackwell (October 23, 1922 – October 29, 1996) was an American right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball. Nicknamed "The Whip" for his sidearm, snap-delivery, Blackwell played for the Cincinnati Reds for most of his career (1942; 1946–1952). He also played with the New York Yankees (1952–1953) and finished his career with the Kansas City Athletics (1955).

The Script error: No such module "convert"., Script error: No such module "convert". Blackwell is considered to have been one of the greatest pitchers of his era, and starred in a six-year streak in the All-Star Game from 1946 through 1951.

On June 18, 1947, Blackwell pitched a 6–0 no-hitter against the Boston Braves. In his next start, June 22, against the Brooklyn Dodgers, he took a no-hitter into the ninth inning, trying to tie the achievement of his veteran Reds teammate Johnny Vander Meer from nine years earlier, of throwing consecutive no-hitters. However, the no-hit attempt was broken up Eddie Stanky. The Reds won the game 4–0.

In a 10-season career, Blackwell posted an 82–78 record with 839 strikeouts and a 3.30 ERA in 1,321 innings pitched. In 1960, he was inducted into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame. During a 2007 New York Mets broadcast, Blackwell was referred to as the best right-handed pitcher ever by Hall of Famer Ralph Kiner. Dodgers broadcaster Vin Scully also reported that batters were genuinely afraid to face him.

Blackwell's best year was 1947, when he recorded 22 wins against 7 losses, including 16 consecutive complete game victories for a weak-hitting team. At a slender 6 ft 6 inches, he was one of the first very tall pitchers, and a fearsome sight to hitters of that era. His bizarre sidearm delivery, described by a leading sports pundit as "looking like a man falling out of a tree," put unusual strain on his arm, abbreviating his success and, ultimately, his career. Along with arm problems, Blackwell had his right kidney removed in January 1949 after it became infected, and then had an emergency appendectomy in September 1950.[1]

In 1948, Ziff-Davis Publishing Company produced "The Secrets of Pitching, By Ewell Blackwell". It is a short book that gives good advice for young pitchers."

See also

References

  1. ^ Linkugel, Wil A (1998). They Tasted Glory: Among the Missing at the Baseball Hall of Fame. United States: McFarland Publishing. p. 272. ISBN 9780786404841. 

External links

Preceded by
Bob Feller
No-hitter pitcher
June 18, 1947
Succeeded by
Don Black