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Galanin receptor 2

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Identifiers
SymbolsGALR2 ; GAL2-R; GALNR2; GALR-2
External IDsOMIM603691 MGI1337018 HomoloGene2863 IUPHAR: 244 ChEMBL: 3176 GeneCards: GALR2 Gene
RNA expression pattern
File:PBB GE GALR2 211226 at tn.png
File:PBB GE GALR2 gnf1h09841 s at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
SpeciesHumanMouse
Entrez881114428
EnsemblENSG00000182687ENSMUSG00000020793
UniProtO43603O88854
RefSeq (mRNA)NM_003857NM_010254
RefSeq (protein)NP_003848NP_034384
Location (UCSC)Chr 17:
74.07 – 74.07 Mb
Chr 11:
116.28 – 116.28 Mb
PubMed search[1][2]

Galanin receptor 2, (GAL2) is a G-protein coupled receptor encoded by the GALR2 gene.[1]

Galanin is an important neuromodulator present in the brain, gastrointestinal system, and hypothalamopituitary axis. It is a 30-amino acid non-C-terminally amidated peptide that potently stimulates growth hormone secretion, inhibits cardiac vagal slowing of heart rate, abolishes sinus arrhythmia, and inhibits postprandial gastrointestinal motility. The actions of galanin are mediated through interaction with specific membrane receptors that are members of the 7-transmembrane family of G protein-coupled receptors. GALR2 interacts with the N-terminal residues of the galanin peptide. The primary signaling mechanism for GALR2 is through the phospholipase C/protein kinase C pathway (via Gq), in contrast to GALR1, which communicates its intracellular signal by inhibition of adenylyl cyclase through Gi. However, it has been demonstrated that GALR2 couples efficiently to both the Gq and Gi proteins to simultaneously activate 2 independent signal transduction pathways.[1]

See also

References

External links

  • "Galanin Receptors: GAL2". IUPHAR Database of Receptors and Ion Channels. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. 

Further reading

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