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General Carrera Province

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General Carrera Province
Provincia de General Carrera
Province
Template:Infobox settlement/columns
Location in the Aysén del General Carlos Ibáñez del Campo Region
Location in the Aysén del General Carlos Ibáñez del Campo Region
Location in Chile

Coordinates: 46°20′S 72°40′W / 46.333°S 72.667°W / -46.333; -72.667Coordinates: 46°20′S 72°40′W / 46.333°S 72.667°W / -46.333; -72.667{{#coordinates:46|20|S|72|40|W|type:adm2nd_region:CL-AI|| |primary |name=

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Country Chile
Region Aisén
Capital Chile Chico
Communes Río Ibáñez
Chile Chico
Government
 • Type Provincial
 • Governor Pedro Durán
Area[1]
 • Total 11,919.5 km2 (4,602.1 sq mi)
Population (2012 Census)[1]
 • Total 6,835
 • Density 0.57/km2 (1.5/sq mi)
 • Urban 3,042
 • Rural 3,879
Sex[1]
 • Men 3,735
 • Women 3,186
Time zone CLT [2] (UTC-4)
 • Summer (DST) CLST [3] (UTC-3)
Area code(s) 56 + 67
Website Government of General Carrera

General Carrera Province (Spanish: Provincia de General Carrera) is one of four provinces of the southern Chilean region of Aisen (XI). Its capital city is Chile Chico.

Administration

As a province, General Carrera is a second-level administrative division, governed by a provincial governor appointed by the president. The province comprises two communes, Río Ibáñez and Chile Chico; each is governed by a municipality, headed by an alcalde.

Geography and demography

According to the 2002 census by the National Statistics Institute (INE), the province spans an area of Script error: No such module "convert". and had a population of 6,921 inhabitants (3,735 men and 3,186 women), giving it a population density of Script error: No such module "convert".. It is the sixth least populated province in the country. Of these, 3,042 (44%) lived in urban areas and 3,879 (56%) in rural areas. Between the 1992 and 2002 censuses, the population grew by 6% (392 persons).[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Territorial division of Chile" (PDF) (in español). National Statistics Institute. 2007. Retrieved 23 March 2011. 
  2. ^ "Chile Time". WorldTimeZones.org. Retrieved 2010-07-28. 
  3. ^ "Chile Summer Time". WorldTimeZones.org. Retrieved 2010-07-28.