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Gotha Go 146

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Go 146
Role

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This page is a soft redirect. Utility aircraft #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
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National origin

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This page is a soft redirect. Germany #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
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Manufacturer

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This page is a soft redirect. Gotha #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
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Designer

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This page is a soft redirect. Albert Kalkert #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
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First flight

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This page is a soft redirect. 1936 #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
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Number built

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This page is a soft redirect. ca. 4 #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
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The Gotha Go 146 was a twin-engine utility aircraft developed in Germany in the mid-1930s. It was a conventional low-wing cantilever monoplane with tailwheel undercarriage, the main units of which retracted into the engine nacelles on the wings. It was offered to the Luftwaffe as a high-speed courier aircraft, but the Siebel Fh 104 was selected instead. With Gotha unable to attract other customers, no serious production was undertaken and a small number of prototypes were the only examples built.

Specifications

General characteristics

  • Crew: One pilot
  • Capacity: 4 passengers
  • Length: 9.45 m (31 ft 0 in)
  • Wingspan: 12.40 m (40 ft 8 in)
  • Height: 2.70 m (8 ft 10 in)
  • Wing area: 21.7 m2 (234 ft2)
  • Empty weight: 1,520 kg (3,350 lb)
  • Gross weight: 2,200 kg (4,850 lb)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Hirth HM 508E, 180 kW (240 hp) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 335 km/h (208 mph)
  • Range: 1,000 km (620 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 5,000 m (16,400 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 7.5 m/s (1,470 ft/min)

References

  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. p. 427. ISBN 0-7106-0710-5. 
  • Nowarra, Heinz (1983). Die deutsche Luftrüstung 1933-1945. Bonn: Bernard and Graefe. pp. Teil 2, p.133–34. 
  • "At the Brussels Show". Flight: 556. 3 June 1937. Retrieved 2008-04-07.