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Los Angeles Metro bus fleet

The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (also known as "Metro", "MTA", or "LACMTA") operates a vast fleet of buses. As of 2009, Metro operated the second-largest bus fleet in North America,[1] with a total of 2,472 buses.

Overview

Metro and its predecessor agencies have ordered buses from a variety of manufacturers over the years, including GMC, Flxible, Grumman, AM General, Transportation Manufacturing Corporation (TMC), Neoplan USA, New Flyer Industries, El Dorado National, Orion Bus Industries, Thomas Built Buses, Blue Bird Corporation, and North American Bus Industries (NABI). LACMTA has ordered over 1,500 buses from NABI in recent years, including purchasing an expanded fleet of Script error: No such module "convert". buses, which they used to phase out their traditional Script error: No such module "convert". vehicles.

Alternative fuels and vehicle technology

Metro is a major player in alternative fuel technologies, notably CNG, and the text "Nation's Largest Clean-Air Fleet" appears on the sides of many of its buses. The CNG fleet reduces emissions of particulates by 90%, carbon monoxide by 80%, and greenhouse gases by 20% over the 150 remaining diesel-powered buses in the fleet. Alternative fuel buses have logged more than 450 million operating miles since 1993, an industry record.

Metro has also increased its use of on-board vehicle technology. Most buses are equipped with monitors for Transit TV broadcasts and to display real-time bus maps to show the location through GPS navigation; the latter is the first of its kind in the United States. The screens have been shut off as of early 2015 Metro statement on Transit TV monitors on buses. Also, as part of Metro's ATMS project, most buses include a marquee displaying the date and time, Automatic Voice Annunciation (AVA) for audio and visual announcements of each stop, and an audio and visual "Stop Requested" announcement. A supplemental audio announcement of "For your safety, please watch your step when exiting the bus" was added to all buses on February 28, 2013.

Bus fleet

Metro has the second largest bus fleet in North America with 2,472 buses, behind New York City's Metropolitan Transportation Authority with 5,593 and ahead of Toronto's TTC at 2,031 (2,160 with Wheel Trans).

Active

Make/
Model
Length Picture Year Numbers
(quantity ordered)
Current Paint Schemes Engine Transmission Fuel propulsion
NABI 31-LFW 31 feet 150px 2010 3100-3149
(50 buses)
Metro Local CNG
NFI C40LF 40 feet 150px 2001 5300-5522
(223 buses)
Metro Local
Metro Rapid
Metro Express
  • Allison B400R5 Gen-III
CNG
NFI XN40 2013-15 5600-6149
(550 buses)
Metro Local
Metro Rapid
  • Cummins-Westport ISL-G 8.9L
  • Allison B400R6 Gen-V
CNG
NABI 40-LFW 150px 2000 7000-7214
(215 buses)
Metro Local
Metro Rapid
  • Cummins Westport ISL-G 8.9L
  • Detroit Diesel Series 50G 8.5L
  • Allison B400R5 Gen-III
CNG
150px 2001 7300–7514
(215 buses)
Metro Local
Metro Rapid
  • Detroit Diesel Series 50G 8.5L
  • Cummins Westport ISL-G 8.9L
  • Doosan GL11K 11.1L
  • Allison B400R5 Gen-III
CNG
150px 2002 7600-7949
(350 buses)
Metro Local
Metro Rapid
150px 2005 7525–7599
(75 buses)
Metro Local
Metro Rapid
  • Detroit Diesel Series 50MK-G 8.5L
  • Doosan GL11K (#7540 only)
  • Allison B400R6 Gen-III
NABI 40C-LFW 150px 2003 7980-7999
(20 buses)
Metro Local
  • Detroit Diesel Series 50G 8.5L
  • Allison B400R5 Gen-III
CNG
OBI VI (06.501) 150px 2001 11000–11067
(68 buses)
Metro Local
  • Detroit Diesel Series 50 8.5L
  • Allison B400R5 Gen-III
Diesel
BYD K9 40-foot 2015 1000-1024
(25 buses)
Metro Local
  • TBD
  • TBD
Electric
NABI 42-BRT 42-foot 150px 2008 4200–4205
(6 buses)
Metro Local
  • Ford Triton V10 6.8L
  • ISE ThunderVolt
Hybrid
NABI 45C-LFW 45 feet 2004 8000-8099
(100 buses)
Metro Rapid
  • Detroit Diesel Series 50MK-G 8.5L
  • Cummins Westport ISL-G
  • Allison B400R6 Gen-III
CNG
NABI Metro 45C 150px 2008–09 8100-8400
(301 buses)
Metro Local
Metro Liner
  • Cummins-Westport ISL-G 8.9L
  • Allison B400R6 Gen-IV
CNG
2010-11 8401-8491
(91 buses)
Metro Local
Metro Liner
2012-13 8500-8649
(150 buses)
Metro Local
NABI 60-BRT 60 feet 150px 2005-2006 9200-9399
(200 buses)
Metro Local
Metro Rapid
Metro Liner
  • Cummins-Westport L Gas Plus 8.8L
  • Cummins-Westport ISL-G 8.9L
  • Allison B500R6 Gen-IV
CNG
150px 2006 9400-9494
(95 buses)
Metro Local
Metro Rapid
150px 2007–08 9500-9594
(95 buses)
Metro Local
Metro Rapid
NABI 65-BRT 65 feet 150px 2007 9495
(1 bus)
Metro Liner
  • Cummins-Westport ISL-G 8.9L
  • Allison B500R6 Gen-IV
CNG

Bus divisions

Under the Metro governance structure, the routes operating out of each division are supervised by an integrated/centralized operations division with oversight provided by Service Councils composed of elected officials, appointed representatives, and transit users from a given area served by each division. While the Councils have geographical boundaries, in practice they only define where the members come from, as most of Los Angeles is served by routes operating out of multiple sectors. For instance, the Olympic Boulevard Rapid bus is operated by buses from the San Gabriel Valley sector, despite its entire route being in the Westside or Central Los Angeles areas. A list of routes operating from each sector can be found on the Metro web site.

The SGV-3 in Cypress Park is the oldest bus yard in Metro history, which has been operating since 1907. It is home to 200 buses.

Service sector abbreviations and division numbers are affixed to the windows and sides of many Metro buses. Some also have circular decals with the division name and an illustration in a style similar to that used in New York City and New Jersey.

The following table lists all current bus divisions (rail divisions are not included):

Number Name Sector
1 Central City Gateway Cities
2 Crossroads Depot Gateway Cities
3 North Los Angeles, Cypress Park San Gabriel Valley
4 (non-revenue vehicles) Gateway Cities
5 Arthur Winston, Mid-Cities South Bay
6 Venice Westside/Central
7 West Hollywood Westside/Central
8 West Valley San Fernando Valley
9 El Monte, San Gabriel Valley San Gabriel Valley
10 Gateway Westside/Central
15 East Valley San Fernando Valley
18 South Bay South Bay

Metro is currently building a new bus yard which has been designated Division 13[2] adjacent to the Support Services Center and just east of the Gateway headquarters building. Construction is scheduled to be completed by early 2015.[3]

Closed divisions

The following table lists all former divisions.

Number Name
12 Long Beach
13 Riverside[4]
14 South Los Angeles[5]
16 Pomona

See also

References

  1. ^ Roman, Alex (September–October 2009). "Top 100 Transit Bus Fleets" (PDF). Metro Magazine 105 (8): p. 22. Retrieved 2009-11-05. 
  2. ^ http://www.metro.net/projects/MUDBFP/
  3. ^ http://www.metro.net/board/Items/2011/07_July/20110720AHCPItem32.pdf
  4. ^ http://www.metro.net/board/recap/1997/Recap_032697rbm.pdf Authorize the sale of former RTD Division 13 (Riverside) bus terminal located at 2450 Mulberry Street, Riverside to Gary Rosenfield and/or nominee, for a cash price of $250,000" item #12
  5. ^ Reclaimed bus yard begins life as urban wetland Los Angeles Times Feb. 10, 2012