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Matoke

Matoke, (also known as matooke, ebitookye in south western Uganda, and ibitoke in Rwanda) is the fruit of a variety of starchy banana, commonly referred to as cooking bananas. The fruit is harvested green and then cooked and often mashed or pounded into a meal. In Uganda and Rwanda, the fruit is steam-cooked, and the mashed meal is considered a national dish in both countries.

The medium-sized green fruits, which are of a specific group of banana, the East African Highland bananas (AAA-EAH),[1][2][3] are known in the Bantu languages of the African Great Lakes region as matoke.


Bananas/plantains were a common staple crop around the Lake Victoria area of Uganda, and in the West and Kilimanjaro regions of Tanzania.[4]

Food preparation

File:Ugandan traditional meal.jpg
Ugandan traditional meal with Matoke (mashed green bananas) steamed and served in green banana leaves wrapped around a bowl.
File:Matoke.JPG
Matoke fruits

Matoke are peeled using a knife, wrapped in the plant's leaves (or plastic bags), and set in a cooking pot (Swahili: sufuria) atop the banana stalks. The pot is then placed on a charcoal or wood fire and the matoke is steamed for a couple of hours, water is poured into the bottom of the cooking pot multiple times. The stalks in the bottom of the pot serve to keep the leaf-wrapped fruits above the level of the hot water. While uncooked, the matoke is white and fairly hard; cooking turns it soft and yellow. The matoke is then mashed while still wrapped in the leaves or bags and often served on a fresh banana leaf. It is typically eaten with a sauce made of vegetables, ground peanut, or some type of meat (goat or beef). Matoke are also used to make a popular breakfast dish called Katogo in Uganda.[5] It is cooked as a combination of the peeled bananas and either ground peanuts or beef.[6]

In Bukoba, Tanzania, matoke (or matooke) are cooked with meat or smoked catfish, and beans or groundnuts. This method eliminates the need for preparing a separate sauce. In this recipe, the matoke are not mashed. Up until the early 1980s, this was the most common meal in Bukoba and would be eaten year round.

File:Matooke seller.JPG
Matoke seller in Uganda

See also

Photos

References

  1. ^ Karamura, D. and Mgenzi, B. 2004. On farm conservation of Musa diversity in the Great Lakes region of East Africa. African Crop Science Journal 12(1):75-83.
  2. ^ Karamura, D., Mgenzi, B., Karamura, E. and Sharrock, S. 2004. Exploiting indigenous knowledge for the management and maintenance of Musa biodiversity on farm. African Crop Science Journal 12(1).
  3. ^ Mgenzi, S.R.B., Mshaghuley, I.M., Staver, C. and Nkuba, J.M. 2005. A study on the analysis of Musa processing businesses and their support environment in Tanzania. A paper presented to the Musa processing businesses and their support environment workshop, Manila, Philippines 10-13 Oct. 2005. INIBAP [online], accessed 2011 June 14 from: http://platforms.inibap.org/processing/images/stories/file/pdf/tanzania.pdf.
  4. ^ Raschke, V., Oltersdorf, U., Elmadfa, I., Wahlqvist, M.L., Cheema, B.S.B. and Kouris-Blazos, A. 2007. Content of a novel online collection of traditional east African food habits (1930s – 1960s): data collected by the Max-Planck-Nutrition Research Unit, Bumbuli, Tanzania. Asia Pac. J. Clin. Nutr. 16(1):140-151 [online]. Accessed 2011 June 14 from: http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/Volume16/vol16.1/Finished/Raschke.pdf.
  5. ^ "The king of all breakfast". Daily Monitor. April 1, 2012. Retrieved 19 February 2014. 
  6. ^ "Katogo". Retrieved 19 February 2014. 

External links