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Multi-antimicrobial extrusion protein

Multi-antimicrobial extrusion protein
Identifiers
Symbol MatE
Pfam PF01554
Pfam clan CL0222
InterPro IPR002528
TCDB 2.A.66
OPM superfamily 249
OPM protein 3mkt
For other uses, see [[Mate (disambiguation)#REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
This page is a soft redirect.Mate]].

Multi-antimicrobial extrusion protein (MATE) also known as multidrug and toxin extrusion or multidrug and toxic compound extrusion is a family of proteins which function as drug/sodium or proton antiporters.[1][2][3]

Function

The MATE proteins in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes function as fundamental transporters of metabolic and xenobiotic organic cations.[2][3]

Structure

These proteins are predicted to have 12 alpha-helical transmembrane regions, some of the animal proteins may have an additional C-terminal helix.[4] The X-ray structure of the NorM was determined to 3.65 Å, revealing an outward-facing conformation with two portals open to the outer leaflet of the membrane and a unique topology of the predicted 12 transmembrane helices distinct from any other known multidrug resistance transporter.[5]

Discovery

The multidrug efflux transporter NorM from V. parahaemolyticus which mediates resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents (norfloxacin, kanamycin, ethidium bromide etc.) and its homologue from E. coli were identified in 1998.[6] NorM seems to function as drug/sodium antiporter which is the first example of Na+-coupled multidrug efflux transporter discovered.[7] NorM is a prototype of a new transporter family and Brown et al. named it the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion family.[1] NorM is nicknamed "Last of the multidrug transporters" because it is the last multidrug transporter discovered functionally as well as structurally.[8]

Genes

The following human genes encode MATE proteins:

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Brown MH, Paulsen IT, Skurray RA (January 1999). "The multidrug efflux protein NorM is a prototype of a new family of transporters". Mol. Microbiol. 31 (1): 394–5. PMID 9987140. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2958.1999.01162.x. 
  2. ^ a b Kuroda T, Tsuchiya T (December 2008). "Multidrug efflux transporters in the MATE family". Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1794 (5): 763–8. PMID 19100867. doi:10.1016/j.bbapap.2008.11.012. 
  3. ^ a b Omote H et al. (2006). "The MATE proteins as fundamental transporters of metabolic and xenobiotic organic cations". Trends in pharmacological sciences 27 (11): 587–93. PMID 16996621. doi:10.1016/j.tips.2006.09.001. 
  4. ^ Hvorup RN, Winnen B, Chang AB, Jiang Y, Zhou XF, Saier MH (March 2003). "The multidrug/oligosaccharidyl-lipid/polysaccharide (MOP) exporter superfamily". Eur. J. Biochem. 270 (5): 799–813. PMID 12603313. doi:10.1046/j.1432-1033.2003.03418.x. 
  5. ^ He X, Szewczyk P, Karykin A, Hong WX, Zhang Q, Chang G (2010). "Structure of a Cation-bound Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion Transporter". Nature 467 (7318): 991–994. PMC 3152480. PMID 20861838. doi:10.1038/nature09408. 
  6. ^ Morita Y, Kodama K, Shiota S, Mine T, Kataoka A, Mizushima T, Tsuchiya T (July 1998). "NorM, a Putative Multidrug Efflux Protein, of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Its Homolog in Escherichia coli". Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 42 (7): 1778–82. PMC 105682. PMID 9661020. 
  7. ^ Morita Y, Kataoka A, Shiota S, Mizushima T, Tsuchiya T (December 2000). "NorM of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Is an Na+-Driven Multidrug Efflux Pump". J. Bacteriol. 182 (23): 6694–7. PMC 111412. PMID 11073914. doi:10.1128/JB.182.23.6694-6697.2000. 
  8. ^ van Veen HW (2010). "Structural biology: Last of the multidrug transporters". Nature 467 (7318): 926–7. PMID 20962836. doi:10.1038/467926a. 


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