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Northern Thailand

File:Thailand North six regions.png
Map of Thailand highlighting the provinces of the northern region in the six-region system
File:Thailand north numbered.png
Provinces of the northern region in the four-region system

Northern Thailand is geographically characterised by multiple mountain ranges, which continue from the Shan Hills in bordering Myanmar and Laos, and the river valleys which cut through them. Though like most of Thailand, it has a tropical savanna climate, its relatively high elevation and latitude contribute to more pronounced seasonal temperature variation, with cooler winters than the other regions. Historically it is related to the Lanna Kingdom and its culture.

Regional classification of Northern Thailand

The northern region, as defined by the National Geographical Committee in 1978, consists of nine provinces. Geographically the division, according to the six-region system, includes most of the mountainous natural region of the Thai highlands.

The four-region classification system adds seven provinces, bringing the total up to sixteen. In the four-region system Northern Thailand includes the upper-central-region Prov the following:

Seal Name Capital Population Area (km²) Density ISO code
50px Chiang Mai Province Chiang Mai 1,646,144 20,107.0 81.9 TH-50
50px Lamphun Province Lamphun 403,952 4,505.9 89.7 TH-51
50px Lampang Province Lampang 757,534 12,534.0 60.4 TH-52
50px Uttaradit Province Uttaradit 461,040 7,838.6 58.8 TH-53
50px Phrae Province Phrae 458,750 6,538.6 70.2 TH-54
50px Nan Province Nan 476,612 11,472.1 41.5 TH-55
50px Phayao Province Phayao 486,472 6,335.1 76.8 TH-56
50px Chiang Rai Province Chiang Rai 1,198,656 11,678.4 102.6 TH-57
50px Mae Hong Son Province Mae Hong Son 244,048 12,681.3 19.2 TH-58

Note: The population as 31 December 2011.

Geography

See also: Mae Chan Fault

Parallel mountain ranges extend from the Daen Lao Range (ทิวเขาแดนลาว), in the southern region of the Shan Hills, in a north-south direction, the Dawna Range (ทิวเขาดอยมอนกุจู) forming the western border of Thailand between Mae Hong Son and the Salween River.[1] To the east the Thanon Thong Chai Range (เทือกเขาถนนธงชัย), the Khun Tan Range (อยขุนตาน), the Phi Pan Nam Range (ทิวเขาผีปันน้ำ), as well as the western part of the Luang Prabang Range (ะทิวเขาหลวงพระบาง), form the natural region of the Thai highlands together with the former.[2]

These high mountains are incised by steep river valleys and upland areas that border the central plain. A series of rivers, including the Nan, Ping, Wang, Yom, and Nan, flow southwards through mountain valleys and join to form the Chao Phraya in Nakhon Sawan Province in the central region. Sirikit Dam is on the Nan River in Uttaradit Province. The northeastern part is drained by rivers flowing into the Mekong basin, like the Kok and Ing.

The four-region system includes the northern parts of the central plain as well as some mountainous areas bordering the western and the northeastern limits.

See also

References

  1. ^ Northern Thailand
  2. ^ ดร.กระมล ทองธรรมชาติ และคณะ, สังคมศึกษา ศาสนาและวัฒนธรรม ม.1, สำนักพิมพ์ อักษรเจริญทัศน์ อจท. จำกัด, 2548, หน้า 24-25

External links

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