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Open Access Articles- Top Results for Shoot

International Journal of Advanced Research in Electrical, Electronics and Instrumentation Energy
Switched Boost Inverter With PWM Control And Development Of A Prototype Model
International Journal of Advanced Research in Electrical, Electronics and Instrumentation Energy
Fuel Cell Fed Single Stage Boost Inverter with Unique Impedance Network
International Journal of Advanced Research in Electrical, Electronics and Instrumentation Energy
Photovoltaic Grid-Connected System Based On Cascaded Quasi-Z-Source Network
International Journal of Advanced Research in Electrical, Electronics and Instrumentation Energy
Power Donuts in Overhead Lines for Dynamic Thermal Rating Measurement, Prediction and Electric Power Line Monitoring
International Journal of Advanced Research in Electrical, Electronics and Instrumentation Energy
Analysis of T-Source Inverter with Simple Boost Control Technique for Improving Voltage Gain

Shoot

This article is about new growth in plants. For other uses, see Shoot (disambiguation).

In botany, shoots consist of stems including their appendages, the leaves and lateral buds, flowering stems and flower buds.[1][2] The new growth from seed germination that grows upward is a shoot where leaves will develop. In the spring, perennial plant shoots are the new growth that grows from the ground in herbaceous plants or the new stem and/or flower growth that grows on woody plants.

In everyday speech, shoots are often synonymous with stems. Stems, which are an integral component of shoots, provide an axis for buds, fruits, and leaves.

Young shoots are often eaten by animals because the fibres in the new growth have not yet completed secondary cell wall development, making the young shoots softer and easier to chew and digest. As shoots grow and age, the cells develop secondary cell walls that have a hard and tough structure. Some plants (e.g. bracken) produce toxins that make their shoots inedible or less palatable.

See also

References

  1. Esau, K. (1953). Plant Anatomy. New York: John Wiley & Sons Inc. p. 411. 
  2. Cutter, E.G. (1971). Plant Anatomy, experiment and interpretation, Part 2 Organs. London: Edward Arnold. p. 117. ISBN 0713123028. 


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