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Open Access Articles- Top Results for Socialist Campaign Group

Socialist Campaign Group

"Campaign Group" redirects here. For other uses, see Advocacy group.

The Socialist Campaign Group is a left-wing, democratic socialist grouping of Labour Party Members of Parliament in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom. It was formed in December 1982 as an alternative Parliamentary left-wing group to the Tribune Group.[1] The Campaign Group, as it is commonly known, is on the left of the Labour Party and has been highly critical of the New Labour project.

Founding members

Current members

Former members

Deceased

The following died while still serving in Parliament:

Left Parliament

These members left Parliament voluntarily, either to retire or for new opportunities elsewhere:

Constituencies abolished

These members left the Commons in 1983 following the abolition of their constituencies as a result of redrawing of boundaries:

Lost seat in general election

These members lost their seats in general elections:

Expelled

The following members were expelled from the Labour Party:

Deselected

The following members were deselected by their Constituency Labour Parties:

Defected

In 2005 Brian Sedgemore resigned the Labour Party whip and defected to the Liberal Democrats.

Resigned

The following members resigned their membership of the Campaign Group in 1985 in a show of support for Neil Kinnock's reforms:

The following members resigned their membership of the Campaign Group in 1988 in protest at Tony Benn's decision to challenge Neil Kinnock for the Labour leadership that year:

The following members resigned their membership of the Campaign Group at various points in time when they became front bench spokespersons or members of the government, which was seen as incompatible with membership of the Campaign Group:

The following members resigned their membership of the Campaign Group for other reasons:

References

  1. ^ Patrick Seyd, The Rise and Fall of the Labour Left (1987). London: Macmillan.
  2. ^ Patrick Seyd, The Rise and Fall of the Labour Left (1987), p. 222. London: Macmillan.