Adverts

Open Access Articles- Top Results for Solanidine

Solanidine

Solanidine
200px
colspan=2 style="background:#f8eaba; border-top:2px solid transparent; border-bottom:2px solid transparent; text-align:center;" #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
This page is a soft redirect. Names

#REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
This page is a soft redirect.-


Other names
Solatubin; Solatubine; Solanid-5-en-3beta-ol, Solanid-5-en-3-beta-ol
colspan=2 style="background:#f8eaba; border-top:2px solid transparent; border-bottom:2px solid transparent; text-align:center;" #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
This page is a soft redirect. Identifiers#REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
This page is a soft redirect.-



80-78-4
ChEBI CHEBI:28374
ChemSpider 59150
Jmol-3D images Image
Image
PubChem Template:Chembox PubChem/format
colspan=2 style="background:#f8eaba; border-top:2px solid transparent; border-bottom:2px solid transparent; text-align:center;" #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
This page is a soft redirect. Properties

#REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
This page is a soft redirect.-

C27H43NO
Molar mass Lua error in Module:Math at line 495: attempt to index field 'ParserFunctions' (a nil value). g·mol−1
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Solanidine is a poisonous steroidal alkaloid chemical compound that occurs in plants of the Solanaceae family, such as potato and Solanum americanum.[1][2] Human ingestion of solanidine also occurs via the consumption of the glycoalkaloids, α-solanine and α-chaconine, present in potatoes.[3][4] The sugar portion of these glycoalkaloids hydrolyses in the body, leaving the solanidine portion.[4] Solanidine occurs in the blood serum of normal healthy people who eat potato, and serum solanidine levels fall markedly once potato consumption ceases.[5] Solanidine from food is also stored in the human body for prolonged periods of time, and it's been suggested by researchers that it could be released during times of metabolic stress with the potential for deleterious consequences.[6] Solandine is responsible for neuromuscular syndromes via cholinesterase inhibition.[7][8]

Uses

Solanidine is a very important precursor for the synthesis of hormones and some pharmacologically active compounds.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b Nikolic, NC; Stankovic, MZ (2003). "Solanidine hydrolytic extraction and separation from the potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) vines by using solid-liquid-liquid systems". Journal of agricultural and food chemistry 51 (7): 1845–9. PMID 12643640. doi:10.1021/jf020426s. 
  2. ^ Mohy-ud-dint, A., Khan,Z., Ahmad, M., Kashmiri, M.A. (2010). "Chemotaxonomic value of alkaloids in Solanum nigrum complex" (PDF). Pakistan Journal of Botany 42 (1): 653–660. 
  3. ^ Friedman, M; Henika, PR; MacKey, BE (2003). "Effect of feeding solanidine, solasodine and tomatidine to non-pregnant and pregnant mice". Food and chemical toxicology 41 (1): 61–71. PMID 12453729. doi:10.1016/s0278-6915(02)00205-3. 
  4. ^ a b Kuiper-Goodman, T., Nawrot, P.S., Solanine and Chaconine, IPCS Inchem
  5. ^ Harvey, M.H.; McMillan, M.; Morgan, M.R.A.; Chan, H. W. S. (1985). "Solanidine is Present in Sera of Healthy Individuals and in Amounts Dependent on their Dietary Potato Consumption". Human & Experimental Toxicology 4 (2): 187. doi:10.1177/096032718500400209. 
  6. ^ Claringbold, W. D. B.; Few, J. D.; Renwick, J. H. (1982). "Kinetics and retention of solanidine in man". Xenobiotica 12 (5): 293–302. PMID 7135998. doi:10.3109/00498258209052469. 
  7. ^ Bushway, R.J., Savage, S.A., Ferguson, B.S., Inhibition of acetyl cholinesterase by solanaceous glycoalkaloids and alkaloids, American Potato Journal, Aug. 1987, Volume 64, Issue 8, pp 409-413 [1]
  8. ^ Everist, S.L., Poisonous Plants of Australia, Angus and Robertson, 1974, ISBN 0207142289.