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Standard E-1

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This page is a soft redirect.Standard E-1 of 1919 displayed in the Virginia Aviation Museum at Richmond, Virginia in USAAS markings #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
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Standard E-1
Role

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This page is a soft redirect. Military trainer #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
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National origin

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Manufacturer

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This page is a soft redirect. Standard Aircraft Corporation #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
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First flight

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This page is a soft redirect. 1917 #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other
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Primary user

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Number built

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The Standard E-1 was an early American Army fighter aircraft, tested in 1917.[1] It was the only pursuit aircraft manufactured by the United States during World War I.[2] It arrived late in World War I, and as a result saw more use in the months following the Armistice than those preceding it.[3]

Design and development

Built by the Standard Aircraft Corporation, the E-1 was an open-cockpit single-place tractor biplane, powered by an 80 hp (60 kW) Le Rhône or 100 hp (75 kW) Gnome rotary engine.

Operational history

It proved unsuitable as a fighter, but 128 were bought as an advanced trainer.[4] Of these, 30 were powered by the Gnome rotary engine of 100 horsepower and 98 were powered by the LeRhone C-9 rotary engine of 80 horsepower.[3] After World War I, three were modified as RPVs.


Operators

23x15px United States

Survivors

Specifications

General characteristics

  • Crew: One pilot
  • Length: 18 ft 5 in (5.61 m)
  • Wingspan: 24 ft 0 in (7.31 m)
  • Height: 7 ft 10 in (2.39 m)
  • Empty weight: 368 lb (811 kg)
  • Gross weight: 1,140 lb (520 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Le Rhône rotary, 80 hp (60 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 100 mph (160 km/h)
  • Range: 180 miles (290 km)
  • Service ceiling: 14,500 ft (4,420[6] m)

See also

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

Related lists

References

Notes
  1. ^ Taylor 1989, p. 839.
  2. ^ a b "Historical Aircraft." Virginia Aviation Museum. Retrieved: 14 February 2011.
  3. ^ a b c United States Air Force Museum 1975, p. 11.
  4. ^ Donald 1997, p. 854.
  5. ^ "Standard E-1." Fantasy of Flight. Retrieved: 26 March 2012.
  6. ^ Angelucci 1983, p. 87.
Bibliography
  • Angelucci, Enzo. The Rand McNally Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft, 1914-1980. San Diego, California: The Military Press, 1983. ISBN 0-517-41021-4.
  • Donald, David, ed. "Standard Aircraft." Encyclopedia of World Aircraft. Etobicoke, Ontario: Prospero Books, 1997. ISBN 0-7607-0592-5.
  • Taylor, Michael J. H. Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions, 1989. ISBN 0-517-69186-8.
  • United States Air Force Museum Guidebook. Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio: Air Force Museum Foundation, 1975.
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External links

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