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Succinyl-CoA

Succinyl-CoA
150px
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604-98-8 7pxN
ChEBI CHEBI:15380 7pxY
ChemSpider 83179 7pxY
Jmol-3D images Image
MeSH succinyl-coenzyme+A
PubChem Template:Chembox PubChem/format
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C25H40N7O19P3S
Molar mass 867.608
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
 14pxN verify (what is10pxY/10pxN?)
Infobox references

Succinyl-Coenzyme A, abbreviated as Succinyl-CoA or SucCoA, is a combination of succinic acid and coenzyme A.

Sources

It is an important intermediate in the citric acid cycle, where it is synthesized from α-Ketoglutarate by α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase through decarboxylation. During the process, coenzyme A is added.

With B12 as an enzymatic cofactor, it is also synthesized from propionyl CoA, the odd-numbered fatty acid, which cannot undergo beta-oxidation.[1] Propionyl-CoA is carboxylated to D-methylmalonyl-CoA, isomerized to L-methylmalonyl-CoA, and rearranged to yield succinyl-CoA via a vitamin B12-dependent enzyme. Succinyl-CoA is an intermediate of the citric acid cycle and can be readily incorporated there.

Fate

It is converted into succinate through the hydrolytic release of coenzyme A by succinyl-CoA synthetase (succinate thiokinase).

Another fate of succinyl-CoA is porphyrin synthesis, where succinyl-CoA and glycine are combined by ALA synthase to form δ-aminolevulinic acid (dALA).

Formation

Succinyl CoA can be formed from methylmalonyl CoA through the utilization of deoxyadenosyl-B12 (deoxyadenosylcobalamin) by the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. This reaction, which requires vitamin B12 as a cofactor, is important in the catabolism of some branched-chain amino acids as well as odd-chain fatty acids.

Interactive pathway map

Click on genes, proteins and metabolites below to link to respective articles. [§ 1]

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|{{{bSize}}}px|alt=TCA Cycle edit||]]
  1. The interactive pathway map can be edited at WikiPathways: "TCACycle_WP78". 

References

  1. Halarnkar PP, Blomquist GJ (1989). "Comparative aspects of propionate metabolism". Comp. Biochem. Physiol., B 92 (2): 227–31. PMID 2647392. doi:10.1016/0305-0491(89)90270-8. 

Template:Citric acid cycle