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The Protest Psychosis

The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease
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Author Jonathan Metzl
Country United States
Subject Psychiatry
Published 2010 (Beacon Press)
Media type Print
Pages 246
ISBN 0-8070-8592-8
OCLC 319496892

The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease is a 2010 book written by psychiatrist Jonathan Metzl (who also has a Ph.D. in American studies), and published by Beacon Press,[1] covering the history of the 1960s Ionia State Hospital—located in Ionia, Michigan and converted into the Ionia Correctional Facility in 1986. The facility is claimed to have been one of America's largest and most notorious state psychiatric hospitals in the era before deinstitutionalization.

The book focuses on exposing the trend of this hospital to diagnose African Americans with schizophrenia because of their civil rights ideas. The book suggests that in part the sudden influx of such diagnoses could be traced to a change in wording in the DSM-II, which compared to the previous edition added "hostility" and "aggression" as signs of the disorder. Metzl writes that this change resulted in structural racism.

The book was well reviewed in JAMA, where it was described as "a fascinating, penetrating book by one of medicine's most exceptional young scholars."[2] The book was also reviewed in the American Journal of Psychiatry,[3] Psychiatric Services,[4] Transcultural Psychiatry,[5] Psychiatric Times,[6] The American Journal of Bioethics,[7] Social History of Medicine,[8] Medical Anthropology Quarterly,[9] Journal of African American History,[10] Journal of Black Psychology,[11] Health: An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine,[12] The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture.[13]

See also

References

  1. ^ Metzl, Jonathan (2010). The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease. Beacon Press. ISBN 0-8070-8592-8. 
  2. ^ Wear, D. (2010). "The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease". JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association 303 (19): 1984–1984. doi:10.1001/jama.2010.629.  edit
  3. ^ Luhrmann, T. M. (2010). "The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease". American Journal of Psychiatry 167 (4): 479–480. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.2009.09101398.  edit
  4. ^ Bell, Carl (1 August 2011). "The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease". Psychiatric Services 62 (8): 979–980. doi:10.1176/appi.ps.62.8.979-a. 
  5. ^ McKenzie, Kwame (July–September 2012). "Jonathan M. Metzl, The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease". Transcultural Psychiatry 49 (3–4): 640–642. doi:10.1177/1363461512448783. 
  6. ^ Fernando, Suman (21 October 2010). "Review – The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease". Psychiatric Times. 
  7. ^ Aultman, Julie (2010). "Review of Jonathan Metzl, The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease". The American Journal of Bioethics 10 (11): 37–38. doi:10.1080/15265161.2010.520600. 
  8. ^ Wald, P. (2011). "Jonathan M. Metzl, the Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease". Social History of Medicine 24: 194–195. doi:10.1093/shm/hkr027.  edit
  9. ^ "The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease by Jonathan Metzl". Medical Anthropology Quarterly 26 (2): 309–310. June 2012. doi:10.1111/j.1548-1387.2012.01214.x.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help);
  10. ^ Johnson, Frank (Fall 2012). Journal of African American History 97 (4): 499–501. doi:10.5323/jafriamerhist.97.4.0499.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  11. ^ Sherry, Alissa (August 2011). "Book Review: Metzl, J. M. (2010). The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease". Journal of Black Psychology 37 (3): 381–383. doi:10.1177/0095798411407066. 
  12. ^ Schneider, B. (2011). "Book review: J.M. Metzl, the Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease, Beacon Press: Boston, MA, 2010; 246 pp". Health: An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine 15 (2): 213–214. doi:10.1177/13634593110150020605.  edit
  13. ^ Staub, Michael (2010). "The protest psychosis: how schizophrenia became a black disease". The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture 3 (2): 253–255. doi:10.1080/17541328.2010.525948. 

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