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Open Access Articles- Top Results for Timeline of Memphis, Tennessee

Timeline of Memphis, Tennessee

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Memphis, Tennessee, USA.

Prior to 19th century

19th century

  • 1819 - Town laid out.[2]
  • 1826 - Town incorporated.[3]
  • 1827
    • Memphis Advocate newspaper begins publication.[4]
    • Marcus B. Winchester becomes mayor.
  • 1836 - Memphis Enquirer newspaper begins publication.[4]
  • 1841 - The Appeal newspaper begins publication.
  • 1843
    • New Orleans-Memphis telegraph begins operating.[3]
    • Memphis Daily Eagle newspaper begins publication.[4]
  • 1844 - Calvary Episcopal Church consecrated.[5]
  • 1849 - Memphis incorporated as a city.[1]
  • 1850
    • Town designated a port of customs.[3]
    • Population: 8,841.[6]
  • 1852 - Elmwood Cemetery established.
  • 1853 - Congregation B'nai Israel founded.
  • 1854 - Jones & Co. chemists in business.[7]
  • 1855 - German Benevolent Society formed.[8]
  • 1857 - Memphis & Charleston Railroad completed.[3]
  • 1858 - Memphis Daily Avalanche newspaper begins publication.[4]
  • 1860 - Population: 22,650.[9]
  • 1861 - Memphis and Ohio Railroad completed.[10]
  • 1862
  • 1864
  • 1866
    • May: Racial unrest.
    • Greenwood School established.[11]
    • Memphis Post begins publication.
  • 1868 - Peabody Hotel in business.[5]
  • 1870
  • 1871
  • 1873 - Yellow fever epidemic.[2]
  • 1874 - Memphis Cotton Exchange founded.
  • 1875 - Southwestern at Memphis (college) established.[1]
  • 1878 - Yellow fever epidemic.[3]
  • 1879 - Yellow fever epidemic.[2]
  • 1880 - Population: 33,592.[6]
  • 1882
    • Tabernacle Missionary Baptist Church established.[13]
    • Chickasaw Cooperage Company incorporated.[7]
  • 1883 - Young Men's Christian Association chartered.[8]
  • 1885 - Peoples Grocery in business.
  • 1887 - Memphis National Bank organized.[7]
  • 1890
    • Nineteenth Century Club formed.[8]
    • Population: 64,589.[3]
  • 1891 - City rechartered.[2]
  • 1892 - Railroad bridge constructed.[6]
  • 1899 - Manassas High School established.

20th century

21st century

See also

Other cities in Tennessee

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Leon E. Seltzer, ed. (1952), Columbia Lippincott Gazetteer of the World, New York: Columbia University Press, p. 1183 
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 "Memphis", Encyclopaedia Britannica (11th ed.), New York, 1910, OCLC 14782424 
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 Federal Writers' Project (1939), "Memphis", Tennessee: a Guide to the State, American Guide Series, New York: Viking 
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 "US Newspaper Directory". Chronicling America. Washington DC: Library of Congress. Retrieved October 9, 2013. 
  5. 5.0 5.1 Commercial and Statistical Review of the City of Memphis, Reilley & Thomas, 1883 
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 Angelo Heilprin and Louis Heilprin, ed. (1906). "Memphis". Lippincott's New Gazetteer. Philadelphia. 
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 Annual Statement of the Trade and Commerce of Memphis, Tenn. ... Reported to the Memphis Merchants' Exchange, 1888 
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 John Preston Young, ed. (1912), Standard history of Memphis, Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn: H.W. Crew, OCLC 850900 
  9. "Memphis". Tennessee State Gazetteer and Business Directory for 1876-7. Nashville: R.L. Polk & Co. 1876. 
  10. "List of Manuscript Collection Finding Aids". Tennessee State Library and Archives. Retrieved October 9, 2013. 
  11. 11.0 11.1 Photographs from the Memphis World, 1949-1964. Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. 2008. ISBN 0915525100. 
  12. G.P. Hamilton (1908). Bright Side of Memphis: A Compendium of Information Concerning the Colored People of Memphis, Tennessee. Memphis. 
  13. James T. Haley, ed. (1895), Afro-American Encyclopaedia, Nashville: Haley & Florida 
  14. Walter Sumner Hayward (1922), Chain stores: their management and operation, New York: McGraw-Hill 
  15. "Memphis, May 22, A.D., 1917". The Crisis (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) 14 (3 (supplement)). July 1917. 
  16. "(Roddy's Citizens' Co-operative Stores)". The Crisis (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) 19 (2). December 1919. 
  17. Thomas Dublin, Kathryn Kish Sklar (ed.), "Chronology", Women and Social Movements in the United States (Alexander Street Press)  (subscription required)
  18. "Our History". Memphis International Airport. Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority. Retrieved October 9, 2013. 
  19. 19.0 19.1 Christopher Silver; John V. Moeser (1995), The Separate City: Black Communities in the Urban South, 1940-1968, Lexington, Ky: University Press of Kentucky, ISBN 0813119111 
  20. Michael K. Honey (1993), Southern Labor and Black Civil Rights: Organizing Memphis Workers, Urbana: University of Illinois Press, ISBN 0252020006 
  21. "On This Day", New York Times, retrieved November 2014 
  22. "Memphis, Tennessee". Global Nonviolent Action Database. Pennsylvania: Swarthmore College. Retrieved October 9, 2013. 
  23. Michael Kirby (1998), "Vollintine-Evergreen, Memphis", Cityscape 4, JSTOR 41486477 
  24. 24.0 24.1 Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in the United States: 1790 to 1990, US Census Bureau, 1998 
  25. R. Serge Denisoff (1975). Solid Gold: The Popular Record Industry. Transaction Publishers. ISBN 978-1-4128-3479-7. 
  26. Stephanie Gilmore (2003). "Dynamics of Second-Wave Feminist Activism in Memphis, 1971-1982: Rethinking the Liberal/Radical Divide". National Women's Studies Association Journal 15. JSTOR 4316946. 
  27. Pluralism Project. "Memphis, Tennessee". Directory of Religious Centers. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University. Retrieved October 9, 2013. 
  28. "Memphis: Mecca on the Mississippi", Ebony, October 2002 
  29. "History and Mission". Opera Memphis. Retrieved October 9, 2013. 
  30. "About the Mayor". City of Memphis. Archived from the original on May 27, 2010. Retrieved October 9, 2013. 
  31. "Open Data Policies at Work". Washington DC: Sunlight Foundation. Retrieved October 15, 2013. 
  32. Federal Writers' Project (1939), "Chronology", Tennessee: a Guide to the State, American Guide Series, New York: Viking – via Hathi Trust 

Further reading

Published in the 19th century
Published in the 20th century
Published in the 21st century

External links

Coordinates: 35°07′03″N 89°58′16″W / 35.117365°N 89.971068°W / 35.117365; -89.971068{{#coordinates:35.117365|-89.971068|type:city_region:US|||||| |primary |name= }}