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Tochinowaka Kiyotaka

Tochinowaka Kiyotaka
栃乃和歌 清隆
File:Tochinowaka 2010 Jan.JPG
Personal information
Born Kiyotaka Kaseda
(1962-05-22) 22 May 1962 (age 57)
Wakayama, Japan
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Career
Stable Kasugano
Record 588-621-24
Debut March, 1985
Highest rank Sekiwake (September, 1987)
Retired July, 1999
Championships 1 (Jūryō)
1 (Makushita)
Special Prizes Fighting Spirit (3)
Outstanding Performance (2)
Technique (1)
Gold Stars 4 (Hokutoumi (2), Onokuni,
Takanohana II)
* Up to date as of August 2007.

Tochinowaka Kiyotaka (born 22 May 1962 as Kiyotaka Kaseda) is a former sumo wrestler from Wakayama Prefecture, Japan. A former amateur champion, he turned professional in 1985, reaching the top makuuchi division in 1987. His highest rank was sekiwake. He was a runner-up in one tournament and earned six special prizes and four kinboshi. After 76 tournaments and 1114 bouts in the top division he retired in 1999. He is now an elder of the Japan Sumo Association and the head coach of Kasugano stable.

Career

He was born in Shimotsu, Kaisō District. He was named Kiyotaka after the great yokozuna of the 1950s, Tochinishiki Kiyotaka.[1] He played baseball in junior high school and ambitions to be a professional, but switched to sumo in high school due to his size.[1] He was an amateur champion at Meiji University, and finished runner-up in the national collegiate yokozuna competition.[1] He made his professional debut in March 1985 in the makushita division, having been given makushita tsukedashi status because of his amateur achievements. The first graduate of Meiji University to have a major impact in professional sumo, he quickly moved up the ranks, progressing through jūryō in just two tournaments and reaching the top makuuchi division in January 1987. He was also the first top division wrestler from Wakayama Prefecture for nearly 40 years.[2] He reached his highest rank of sekiwake in September 1987, and defeated a yokozuna and two ozeki in his first three bouts at the rank.

Tochinowaka remained in the top division for 76 tournaments, winning six special prizes and earning four gold stars for defeating yokozuna. He was runner-up to Konishiki in the tournament of March 1992 and looked set to launch a drive for ozeki promotion, but he was injured in the next tournament and had to withdraw. He made his last appearance in the sanyaku ranks in March 1994. He carried on fighting until the age of 37, retiring in July 1999 when he was the oldest man in the top division.

He was utterly unable to defeat Musashimaru, losing to him 23 times in 23 meetings, and he also lost all 14 bouts he contested with Chiyonofuji. His wins over yokozuna were against Futahaguro in September 1987, Onokuni in January 1988, September 1988 and September 1989, Hokutoumi in January 1990, July 1991 and November 1991, and finally Takanohana in January 1997.

He was a heavy smoker during his active days.[3]

Fighting style

Tochinowaka was at his strongest when he could get a left hand outside, right hand inside grip on his opponent's mawashi, or migi-yotsu. His most commonly used techniques were yorikiri, oshi dashi and uwatenage.

Retirement from sumo

Tochinowaka remained in the sumo world as a toshiyori or elder, initially under the name of Takenawa. In February 2003 his former stablemaster, ex yokozuna Tochinoumi, retired and passed on ownership of the Kasugano name and stable to him. Tochinowaka produced his first top division wrestler, Tochiozan, in May 2007, and Tochinoshin and Kimurayama followed in May and July 2008. In 2009 Kasugano passed on his Tochinowaka shikona to Lee Dae Won, a Korean born wrestler with Japanese citizenship, who reached juryo in September 2010 and makuuchi in May 2011. Kasugano also works as a shinpan or judge of tournament bouts.

In October 2011 he was severely reprimanded by the Sumo Association for beating Tochinoshin and two other wrestlers with a golf club after they repeatedly broke stable rules on curfews and wearing Western style clothes instead of kimono in public.[4] Kasugano admitted responsibility and said, "I honestly think I went too far and I regret it."[4]

Career record

Tochinowaka Kiyotaka[5]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1985 x Makushita tsukedashi #60
6–1
 
West Makushita #31
3–4
 
West Makushita #43
5–2
 
West Makushita #25
5–2
 
West Makushita #13
4–3
 
1986 East Makushita #8
3–4
 
East Makushita #15
4–3
 
East Makushita #10
6–1
 
West Makushita #2
7–0
Champion

 
West Jūryō #8
10–5
 
West Jūryō #3
10–5–PP
Champion

 
1987 East Maegashira #12
7–8
 
East Maegashira #13
10–5
F
West Maegashira #4
10–5
 
East Komusubi #1
9–6
O
West Sekiwake #1
8–7
 
East Sekiwake #1
5–10
 
1988 West Maegashira #1
8–7
West Sekiwake #1
7–8
 
East Komusubi #1
9–6
 
East Komusubi #1
9–6
 
East Komusubi #1
7–8
 
West Maegashira #1
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
1989 East Maegashira #11
7–8
 
West Maegashira #12
8–7
 
West Maegashira #7
10–5
 
West Maegashira #1
8–7
 
East Komusubi #1
5–10
 
West Maegashira #3
7–8
 
1990 East Maegashira #4
10–5
F
East Maegashira #1
8–7
 
West Sekiwake #1
4–11
 
West Maegashira #5
8–7
 
East Maegashira #1
9–6
 
East Komusubi #1
8–7
 
1991 West Sekiwake #1
8–7
 
West Sekiwake #1
6–9
 
East Maegashira #2
7–8
 
East Maegashira #3
8–7
East Maegashira #1
11–4
F
East Komusubi #1
10–5
 
1992 East Komusubi #1
8–7
 
East Komusubi #1
11–4
TO
East Sekiwake #1
2–9–4
 
East Maegashira #5
5–10
 
East Maegashira #11
9–6
 
West Maegashira #3
7–8
 
1993 East Maegashira #6
8–7
 
West Maegashira #1
4–11
 
East Maegashira #8
6–9
 
West Maegashira #13
10–5
 
East Maegashira #3
6–9
 
East Maegashira #6
8–7
 
1994 West Maegashira #1
8–7
 
East Komusubi #1
3–12
 
West Maegashira #7
8–7
 
East Maegashira #1
5–10
 
West Maegashira #5
6–9
 
West Maegashira #7
8–7
 
1995 East Maegashira #2
4–11
 
West Maegashira #6
6–9
 
West Maegashira #8
8–7
 
East Maegashira #2
3–12
 
West Maegashira #8
8–7
 
East Maegashira #2
5–10
 
1996 East Maegashira #6
6–9
 
West Maegashira #8
6–9
 
West Maegashira #12
9–6
 
West Maegashira #10
7–8
 
East Maegashira #13
8–7
 
East Maegashira #8
8–7
 
1997 East Maegashira #4
4–11
West Maegashira #9
9–6
 
East Maegashira #2
5–10
 
East Maegashira #6
5–10
 
East Maegashira #11
8–7
 
West Maegashira #4
3–12
 
1998 West Maegashira #12
9–6
 
West Maegashira #5
5–10
 
West Maegashira #7
8–7
 
East Maegashira #4
3–12
 
East Maegashira #11
8–7
 
East Maegashira #3
5–10
 
1999 East Maegashira #6
6–9
 
West Maegashira #8
8–7
 
East Maegashira #5
5–10
 
West Maegashira #9
Retired
2–8–0
x x
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Sharnoff, Lora (1993). Grand Sumo. Weatherhill. ISBN 0-8348-0283-X. 
  2. ^ Patmore, Angela (1990). The Giants of Sumo. MacDonald & Co. ISBN 0-356-18120-0. 
  3. ^ Schilling, Mark (1994). Sumo: A Fan's Guide. Japan Times. ISBN 4-7890-0725-1. 
  4. ^ a b "Sumo stablemaster Kasugano reprimanded for beating wrestlers". Mainichi Daily News. 19 October 2011. Archived from the original on 21 October 2011. 
  5. ^ "Tochinowaka Kiyotaka Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2012-08-16. 

External links