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Visceral fascia

Visceral fascia
Details
Latin fascia visceralis
Identifiers
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Anatomical terminology

Visceral fascia (also called subserous fascia) suspends the organs within their cavities and wraps them in layers of connective tissue membranes. Each of the organs is covered in a double layer of fascia; these layers are separated by a thin serous membrane.

  • The outermost wall of the organ is known as the parietal layer
  • The skin of the organ is known as the visceral layer. The organs have specialized names for their visceral fasciae. In the brain, they are known as meninges; in the heart they are known as pericardia; in the lungs, they are known as pleura; and in the abdomen, they are known as peritonea.[1]

Fascial dynamics

Visceral fascia is less extensible than superficial fascia. Due to its suspensory role of the organs, it needs to maintain its tone rather consistently. If it is too lax, it contributes to organ prolapse, yet if it is hypertonic, it restricts proper organ motility.[2]

References

  1. ^ Hedley, Gil (2005). The Integral Anatomy Series Vol. 3: Cranial and Visceral Fasciae (DVD). Integral Anatomy Productions. Retrieved 2006-07-17. 
  2. ^ Paoletti, Serge (2006). The Fasciae: Anatomy, Dysfunction & Treatment. Seattle, WA: Eastland Press. pp. 146–147. ISBN 0-939616-53-X.