Journals

Conferences

Open Access Articles- Top Results for Wheelchair Basketball World Championship

Wheelchair Basketball World Championship

Wheelchair Basketball World Championship
Sport Wheelchair basketball
Founded 1973
Country IWBF members
Continent IWBF (International)

The IWBF World Wheelchair Basketball Championship is an international wheelchair basketball competition contested by the men's and the women's national teams of the members of the International Wheelchair Basketball Federation (IWBF), the sport's global governing body.

The first unofficial Wheelchair Basketball World Championships for men was held in 1973,[1] with Bruges, Belgium being the first host city. The unofficial world championship for men was won by Great Britain, with a team that included Philip Craven,[2] who would later become the President of the International Paralympic Committee (IPC). Bruges, Belgium also hosted the first official World Championships, known as the Gold Cup tournament, in 1975.

The men's world championships has been won 6 times by the United States, and once each by Great Britain (unofficial Championship 1973), Israel, France Canada, and Australia. Wheelchair basketball world championships for women have been held since 1990. In the first 6 women's world championships, Canada has won four world titles, and the United States two world titles.

Winners

Year Host Men Women
1973* Bruges (Belgium) 23x15px Great Britain
1975 Bruges (Belgium) Template:Country data Israel
1979 Tampa (United States) 23x15px United States
1983 Halifax (Canada) 23x15px United States
1986 Melbourne (Australia) 23x15px United States
1990 Bruges (Belgium) 23x15px France
Saint-Étienne (France) 23x15px United States
1994[3] Edmonton (Canada) 23x15px United States
Stoke Mandeville (Great Britain) 23x15px Canada
1998[3] Sydney (Australia) 23x15px United States 23x15px Canada
2002[3] Kitakyushu (Japan) 23x15px United States 23x15px Canada
2006[3] Amsterdam (Netherlands) 23x15px Canada 23x15px Canada
2010[3] Birmingham (United Kingdom) 23x15px Australia 23x15px United States
2014 [4][5] Incheon (South Korea) 23x15px Australia
Toronto (Canada) 23x15px Canada

* Unofficial Championship

Results

Summaries

Men

Year Host (final location) Gold medal game Bronze medal game
Gold Score Silver Bronze Score Fourth place
1973*
Details
23x15px Belgium (Bruges) 30x27px
Great Britain
50–37 30x27px
France
30x27px
Netherlands
1975
Details
23x15px Belgium (Bruges) Template:Country data ISR 50–47 30x27px
United States
30x27px
Great Britain
1979
Details
23x15px United States (Tampa) 30x27px
United States
60–49 30x27px
Netherlands
30x27px
France
1983
Details
23x15px Canada (Halifax) 30x27px
United States
86–67 30x27px
France
30x27px
Sweden
1986
Details
23x15px Australia (Melbourne) 30x27px
United States
61–40 30x27px
Canada
30x27px
Netherlands
1990[6]
Details
23x15px Belgium (Bruges) 30x27px
France
62–61 30x27px
United States
30x27px
Canada
30x27px
Netherlands
1994[3]
Details
23x15px Canada (Edmonton) 30x27px
United States
67–53 30x27px
Great Britain
30x27px
Canada
72–62 30x27px
France
1998[3]
Details
23x15px Australia (Sydney) 30x27px
United States
61–59 30x27px
Netherlands
30x27px
Canada
63–56 30x27px
Australia
2002[3]
Details
Template:Country data Japan (Kitakyushu) 30x27px
United States
30x27px
Great Britain
30x27px
Canada
30x27px
Australia
2006[3]
Details
23x15px Netherlands (Amsterdam) 30x27px
Canada
59–41 30x27px
United States
30x27px
Australia
80–53 30x27px
Netherlands
2010[3]
Details
23x15px Great Britain (Birmingham) 30x27px
Australia
79–69 30x27px
France
30x27px
United States
71–42 30x27px
Italy
2014
Details
Template:Country data South Korea (Incheon) 30x27px
Australia
63–57 30x27px
United States
30x27px
Turkey
68–63 30x27px
Spain

* Unofficial Championship

Women

Year Host (final location) Gold medal game Bronze medal game
Gold Score Silver Bronze Score Fourth place
1990[6]
Details
23x15px France (Saint-Étienne) 30x27px
United States
58–55 30x27px
Germany
30x27px
Canada
1994[3]
Details
23x15px Great Britain (Stoke Mandeville) 30x27px
Canada
45–34 30x27px
United States
30x27px
Australia
38–36 30x27px
Netherlands
1998[3]
Details
23x15px Australia (Sydney) 30x27px
Canada
54–38 30x27px
United States
30x27px
Australia
40–35 Template:Country data JPN
2002[3]
Details
Template:Country data Japan (Kitakyushu) 30x27px
Canada
30x27px
United States
30x27px
Australia
Template:Country data JPN
2006[3]
Details
23x15px Netherlands (Amsterdam) 30x27px
Canada
58–50 30x27px
United States
30x27px
Germany
52–48 30x27px
Australia
2010[3]
Details
23x15px Great Britain (Birmingham) 30x27px
United States
55–53 30x27px
Germany
30x27px
Canada
59–49 30x27px
Australia
2014[7]
Details
23x15px Canada (Toronto) 30x27px
Canada
54–50 30x27px
Germany
30x27px
Netherlands
74–58 30x27px
United States

References

  1. ^ History of the Game, International Wheelchair Basketball Federation (IWBF)
  2. ^ Sir Philip CRAVEN, MBE, Official website of the Olympic Movement
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "World Championships - Results". International Wheelchair Basketball Federation. 
  4. ^ "2014 Incheon World Wheelchair Basketball Championship > Schedule & Result". 2014 Incheon World Wheelchair Basketball Championship Organizing Committee. Retrieved 14 July 2014. 
  5. ^ "2014 Women's World Wheelchair Basketball Championship - Schedule & Results". Wheelchair Basketball Canada. Retrieved 14 July 2014. 
  6. ^ a b Armand Thiboutot, Philip Craven (1996). The 50th Anniversary of Wheelchair Basketball: A History. Waxmann Verlag. p. 80. ISBN 3830954417. 
  7. ^ "Schedule & Results - 2014 WWWBC". Wheelchair Basketball Canada. Retrieved 28 June 2014. 

External links