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Winters, California

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City of Winters
City
Downtown Winters
Downtown Winters
Location in Yolo County and the state of California
Location in Yolo County and the state of California
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Coordinates: 38°31′30″N 121°58′15″W / 38.52500°N 121.97083°W / 38.52500; -121.97083Coordinates: 38°31′30″N 121°58′15″W / 38.52500°N 121.97083°W / 38.52500; -121.97083{{#coordinates:38|31|30|N|121|58|15|W|type:city(6624)_region:US-CA |primary |name=

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Country 23x15px United States
State 23x15px California
County Yolo
Incorporated February 9, 1898[1]
Government
 • Mayor Cecilia Aguiar-Curry[2]
 • State senator Template:Representative/format/sleader[3]
 • Assemblymember Template:Representative/format/sleader[3]
 • U. S. rep. John Garamendi (D)[4]
Area[5]
 • Total 2.937 sq mi (7.607 km2)
 • Land 2.912 sq mi (7.543 km2)
 • Water 0.025 sq mi (0.065 km2)  0.85%
Elevation[6] 135 ft (41 m)
Population (April 1, 2010)[7]
 • Total 6,624
 • Estimate (2013)[7] 6,892
 • Density 2,300/sq mi (870/km2)
Time zone Pacific (UTC−8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC−7)
ZIP code 95694
Area code 530
FIPS code 06-86034
GNIS feature IDs 1652656, 2412288
Website www.cityofwinters.org

Winters is a city in rural Yolo County, California, located along Interstate 505 and Putah Creek. The population was 6,624 as of the 2010 census. It is part of the Sacramento–Arden-Arcade–Yuba City, CA-NV Combined Statistical Area.

Geography

Located at 38°31′30″N 121°58′15″W / 38.52500°N 121.97083°W / 38.52500; -121.97083{{#coordinates:38|31|30|N|121|58|15|W| | |name= }},[8] Winters is a small city located Script error: No such module "convert". from Vacaville. Winters is nearly Script error: No such module "convert". from Sacramento and about Script error: No such module "convert". from San Francisco, California.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of Script error: No such module "convert"., of which, Script error: No such module "convert". of it is land and Script error: No such module "convert". of it (0.85%) is water.

Climate

Winters has hot, mostly dry summers and cool, wet winters. Average January temperatures are a maximum of Script error: No such module "convert". and a minimum of Script error: No such module "convert".. Average July temperatures are a maximum of Script error: No such module "convert". and a minimum of Script error: No such module "convert".. There are an average of 102.0 days with highs of Script error: No such module "convert". or higher and an average of 20.3 days with lows of Script error: No such module "convert".. The record high temperature was Script error: No such module "convert". on June 16, 1961, and July 14, 1972. The record low temperature was Script error: No such module "convert". on December 23, 1990.

Average annual precipitation is Script error: No such module "convert".. There are an average of 64 days with measurable precipitation. The wettest year was 1983 with Script error: No such module "convert". and the driest year was 1976 with Script error: No such module "convert".. The most rainfall in one month was Script error: No such module "convert". in January 1995. The most rainfall in 24 hours was Script error: No such module "convert". on March 29, 1907. Snowfall is a rarity in Winters, but Script error: No such module "convert". fell in January 1973 and Script error: No such module "convert". fell in December 1988.[9]

History

Winters post office was established in 1875.[10] Winters incorporated in 1898.[10] The name is in honor of Theodore Winters, who provided half of the town's land.[10] Another important early pioneer, John Reid Wolfskill, started the agricultural development of the Sacramento Valley here, planting orchards and vineyards in 1842.[11] In 1935, Wolfskill's heirs deeded 100 acres of the Wolfskill Ranch in Winters to the University of California, Davis, which had been founded in 1908. The land was to be used for an experimental orchard.[12]

The town is noted as the one-time residence of cartoonist R. Crumb[citation needed] and former baseball player Frank Demaree.[citation needed]

Economy

Top employers

According to Winters' 2011 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[13] the top employers in the city are:

# Employer # of Employees
1 Winters Joint Unified School District 220
2 Mariani Nut Company 200
3 Buckhorn Restaurant Group 100
4 Double M Trucking 70
5 Pavestone 50

Demographics

2010

The 2010 United States Census[14] reported that Winters had a population of 6,624. The population density was 2,255.2 people per square mile (870.7/km²). The racial makeup of Winters was 4,635 (70.0%) White, 43 (0.6%) African American, 56 (0.8%) Native American, 63 (1.0%) Asian, 7 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 1,488 (22.5%) from other races, and 332 (5.0%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3,469 persons (52.4%).

The Census reported that 6,618 people (99.9% of the population) lived in households, 6 (0.1%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 0 (0%) were institutionalized.

There were 2,186 households, out of which 949 (43.4%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 1,322 (60.5%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 255 (11.7%) had a female householder with no husband present, 134 (6.1%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 123 (5.6%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 16 (0.7%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 365 households (16.7%) were made up of individuals and 134 (6.1%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.03. There were 1,711 families (78.3% of all households); the average family size was 3.40.

The population was spread out with 1,707 people (25.8%) under the age of 18, 741 people (11.2%) aged 18 to 24, 1,707 people (25.8%) aged 25 to 44, 1,868 people (28.2%) aged 45 to 64, and 601 people (9.1%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35.9 years. For every 100 females there were 102.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.9 males.

There were 2,299 housing units at an average density of 782.7 per square mile (302.2/km²), of which 1,425 (65.2%) were owner-occupied, and 761 (34.8%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.7%; the rental vacancy rate was 5.0%. 4,401 people (66.4% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 2,217 people (33.5%) lived in rental housing units.

2000

As of the census[15] of 2000, there were 6,125 people, 1,907 households, and 1,546 families residing in the city. The population density was 860.0/km² (2,226.6/mi²). There were 1,954 housing units at an average density of 274.3/km² (710.3/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 69.81% White, 0.67% African American, 0.88% Native American, 1.00% Asian, 0.28% Pacific Islander, 22.56% from other races, and 4.80% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 44.41% of the population.

There were 1,907 households out of which 48.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.1% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.9% were non-families. 14.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.21 and the average family size was 3.56.

In the city the population was spread out with 33.3% under the age of 18, 8.9% from 18 to 24, 30.9% from 25 to 44, 19.1% from 45 to 64, and 7.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 103.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $48,678, and the median income for a family was $55,183. Males had a median income of $40,257 versus $27,662 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,133. About 4.2% of families and 5.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.4% of those under age 18 and 5.9% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people

Notes

  1. ^ "California Cities by Incorporation Date" (WORD). California Association of Local Agency Formation Commissions. Retrieved August 25, 2014. 
  2. ^ "ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES -- City Manager". City of Winters. Retrieved October 14, 2014. 
  3. ^ a b "Statewide Database". UC Regents. Retrieved January 27, 2015. 
  4. ^ "California's 3rd Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 1, 2013. 
  5. ^ "2010 Census U.S. Gazetteer Files – Places – California". United States Census Bureau. 
  6. ^ "Winters". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved October 13, 2014. 
  7. ^ a b "Winters (city) QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 9, 2015. 
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Winters, California
  9. ^ http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/cgi-bin/cliMAIN.pl?ca9742
  10. ^ a b c Durham, David L. (1998). California's Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Clovis, Calif.: Word Dancer Press. p. 578. ISBN 1-884995-14-4. 
  11. ^ Larkey, Joann Leach; Walters, Shipley; Wellings, Marjorie; Yolo County Historical Society, Yolo County Superintendent of Schools (October 1987). Yolo County: Land of Changing Patterns : An Illustrated History. Windsor Publications. p. 18. 
  12. ^ "Olive harvest and walking tour at Wolfskill Ranch in Winters Part of UC Davis centennial celebration". Daily Democrat. 8 October 2008. Retrieved 12 August 2014. 
  13. ^ City of Winters CAFR
  14. ^ "2010 Census Interactive Population Search: CA - Winters city". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2014. 
  15. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links